Pune Mirror : Pak Patient Improves, Shows Cognitive signs

PAK PATIENT IMPROVES, SHOWS COGNITIVE SIGNS

Pak patient improves, shows cognitive signs
Sajal with her parents and her doctor, Rajas Deshpande, from Ruby Hall Clinic (PIC:MAHENDRA KOLHE)

DOCS SEE SUCCESS IN CEREBRAL PALSY TREATMENT

Rare case of 7-yr-old had several complications and drug resistance that had to be overcome

A seven-year-old Pakistani girl born with cerebral palsy has been successfully treated by city doctors — despite severe infection and an umpteen number of complications —in nothing short of a medical miracle. Not only was she cured, she also started showing signs of cognitive abilities.

A group of doctors from Ruby Hall Clinic treated the girl, named Sajal, last week. She had been brought to the hospital with glossitis, laryngitis, pharyngitis, pulmonary aspiration, bacterial infection, urinary infection, skin rashes and severe sepsis. Timely medical intervention helped treat all these problems even though the child was resistant to several antibiotics. “This made it even more challenging for us to control her infections and treat her thoroughly,” said Dr Rajas Deshpande, head of neurology, Ruby Hall Clinic, adding, “The child came to us with seven to eight types of issues. It was very difficult for us to treat her. But, with the right antibiotics, we managed to ease the severity of her condition. Now, she is all set to fly back home.” He was helped by Dr Ventaramani and Dr Bamkin Amin in the case.

Sajal’s mother, Shahzia, offered, “Sajal suffered from many complications and was not even able to pass urine or stool for three to four days in a row. We were not able to feed her or admit her to any hospital in Pakistan as many doctors turned us away, looking at her complications, saying there were no chances of improvement. That is why we came running to Pune and got her admitted at once. Sajal’s mouth had a lot of rashes, her lips were torn. No cream or gel given to us in Pakistan would heal her tearing lips. The infection was severe and kept spreading. Within three days of coming here, my child showed signs of improvement. Now, after six days, we are flying back to Pakistan.”

This is not her first visit to India; she has made several visits to treat her daughter’s cerebral palsy. “In the last few years, we took her to many countries, from Germany to Europe and Holland. But, no doctor was willing to take up her case. They said our child could never recover. Sajal had several fits and epileptic attacks in a day and a number of allergies and resistance to drugs. She was in a totally vegetative state. After coming to Pune, she began recognising voices, especially mine and my husband’s, reacting to light and also to her siblings. Now, there is more than 20 per cent improvement in her condition,” Shahzia added. She was told that no drugs for epilepsy or cerebral palsy were available in Pakistan.

“If the epileptic attacks of such patients are controlled well, learning or recognising people or voices can get easier. In Sajal’s case, we controlled her fits and her brain showed improvement. Strong antibiotics and antiepileptic drugs were given to her. And now, Sajal has improved by more than 20 per cent,” Deshpande stressed.

Other prominent doctors hailed the judicious treatment, with Dr Hemant Sant, president of the Neurological Society of Pune, saying, “A single infection is commonly spotted, but many infections coupled with complications is uncommon. Such cases are very challenging and a moment’s delay can prove life threatening.” Dr Sushil Patkar, a neurosurgeon from Poona Hospital and Research Centre, added, “Children born with this condition are very difficult to deal with. So, one has to be careful when they get infections. They need constant attention and care. Controlling seizures and convulsions should be the main aim to better the child’s condition.”

Dr Nirmal Surya, regional vice president of the World Federation of Neurorehabilitation and treasurer of the Indian Academy of Neurology, also brought out some ground realities. “Many a times, due to lack of hygiene or low immunity, children do get infections, but severe complication in one of them is usually not reported. With stronger antibiotics, such infections can be controlled and managed well, if the patient is brought in early. More important are rehabilitation, regular physiotherapy and proper diet, which can help boost the immunity for such special children,” he explained.

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This story was published in Pune Mirror today.

Thank you Dr. Bankim Amin, Dr. VenkatRamani, Pediatric resident doctors (Dr. Upendra, Dr. Tanvi Priya, Dr. Abhijit Kudale, Dr. Supriya Takle, Dr. Radhika Gupta,Dr. Suyog Choudhary, Dr Smita Sangade), Nursing and ward staff, Overseas care staff and so many others who made this possible.

Doctors always make one world, without any borders.
We all treat everyone alike, God / Nature decides about the outcome.
We were blessed with some smiles recently.

The miraculous recovery from infections and cognitive improvement in this girl is also due to the unending effort and sacrifice of her parents, who did not “Dump” the extremely challenged girl child as advised by relatives and society, but gave her the life of a princess, breaking umpteen impossible barriers that stood between her and the medical aid anywhere in the world.

Every parent has boundless love for their child, but these two parents have made her health their career.

May every child be blessed with such parents!

Thank you Ms Nozia Sayyed (Pune Mirror) for your dedicated awareness initiative, and Mr. Mahendra Kolhe (Pune Mirror) for the picture!

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