Have Doctors become Mechanical?

(c) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Sir, most of your stories you share are from your internship days. I have worked as an intern for past 10 months but almost never encountered/experienced such heart touching events and I don’t think, i am any less humane or sensitive than you must be(guessing by your posts). then why almost every intern is so mechanical about his schedule and work? Has the nature of work/ job profile of interns changed to mere mamagiri? Or Its just that, you always went the extra mile to be the awesome being you are! Awaiting your reply eagerly.. Dr. AA

Dear Dr AA, yes doctors have become more and more mechanical, also preoccupied with too many non-clinical tasks like USMLE / MRCP / pg entrance studies, digital addictions and excess non-duty work. Talking to the patients and making them open up is an extremely difficult art. Just like we don’t open up to any roadside stranger, patients do no talk much to a disinterested doctor in a hurry.

There is no one without problems, no one who does not need more love and kindness, but people will not respond if they sense “artificial” empathy. Most illiterates and even infants sense true versus artificial love. So every doctor must learn to imagine himself/ herself in the patients’ condition, and genuinely solve their problem the best they can. There also is a growing tendency to think oneself “superior” to patient or other professionals. No one talks comfortably with the “high handed”. Indeed there are many patients/ relatives more intelligent than the treating doctor, the respect for a doctor is only for his/her medical prowess and kindness.

The first hint of “trying to show off more than what you know” switches off the patient. This tendency is also increasing among some doctors, who transgress their specialty and adversely talk about other specialists or professions. Even the illiterate patients understand (may not express) your overall nature in a few minutes. One must be very polite, humble and genuinely interested and helpful to every patient to be able to connect. In many cases half the agony is the fear of the medical situation. Every doctor does not have time, but those who spend more time per patient hit it well with the patient.

Hope that answers your question. Also, I have always kept a diary. I spent my internship in quite rural and backward areas, the faith in a doctor was still young, and I loved to talk to the “patient”, so time was not an issue. Like most young doctors, I was (and am) never fond of sleep. I had another advantage: I have been a loner.

I know you are (in fact everyone is) gifted by God / Nature a golden heart with a divine song. It is up to us how to use it. The practice of Good Medicine is almost as difficult as a spiritual life: many sacrifices are required. But one should not expect the patient to “Pay Up” or bear the brunt of our sacrifices. It is a choice we have made.

Take care and use the one chance of touching every heart you meet wisely, with immense passion, forgiveness and love. The returns will not be material, but I am sure you don’t care for material gains because you asked this question.

There is no “Extra Mile” for a good doctor. Whatever Good can be done, must be done.

God bless!

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Reply to a question asked by Dr. Arvind Arora, Intern, India.

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