Monthly Archives: December 2016

The Braveheart Orthopaedic Surgeon

The Braveheart Orthopaedic Surgeon
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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The stunned auditorium was hijacked by shame. Nearly a thousand paralysed audience helplessly watched the ongoing horrific drama.

It was the annual day function, the only colourful evening in the year that the whole staff, the Dean, all teachers, resident doctors and students from all batches come together in the medical college. Extraordinary talents that the doctors otherwise have to sacrifice for lack of time: Singing, Acting, Music etc. resurface this one night. I was still in my first year.

Midway through, one resident doctor climbed upon the stage. He was a strong leader, a good student when sober, and had a strong political support, hence usually had his way around everyone. He was excessively drunk. He took charge of the microphone. Few of his friends, some also drunk, were guarding the doors.

“Our Dean is a drunkard. He is also corrupt, he takes bribe from everyone for everything. He is having an affair with this professor of XYZ department. I order the dean to come here on the stage and apologise after I slap him”.

This was beyond anyone’s imagination. One of the teachers requested the drunken offender to please come off stage, but received a flurry of obscene abuses. There was a silence that prayed for relief from this situation.

Dr. Devendrasingh Paliwal got up from the audience.
“Chal, bahot ho gaya drama. Main aa raha hun. Karle kya karega. This is not the place for your allegations. Get down”. Devendra was always known for his physical fitness, and had an intimidating personality. Straightforward and kind, he had almost no enemies.

He went to the stage, grabbed the mic from the offending drunk, handed it over to the MC, and brought down the drunken resident. Within a moment some others joined him to avoid the impending scuffle. The dean and many teachers felt the relief of a lifetime.

Those who anticipated fun at the cost of misery to others were of course disappointed, but at the beginning of my medical career I learnt one of the most valuable lessons of my life: It takes one man to be courageous, not a herd. If you have guts to get up and protest the wrong, there is a fair chance you will succeed. A good man’s fear is the bad man’s strength.

That night at 2 AM, after the programme I went with my friends to the hotel near the railway station for tea. Too much excitement prevailed. Devendra was sitting with his friends at a nearby table. I went to him and introduced myself. He smiled as if nothing special had happened, shook hands and told me “Kisike baap se bhi kabhi nahi darne ka (never ever be scared of anyone).”

We became good friends, we also shared a common mess. Studying at night and going to the railway station (6 kilometres away) for a tea break at 3 AM was also common, and Devendra often asked others to race him to run back those 6 kms after the tea. I can proudly say that I reached second, although a good two minutes after him!

He became an orthopaedic surgeon and started his own hospital, but his ‘Gene’ of fighting injustice and standing up for the good never left him. Stress and anger can be a big hindrance for a doctor, especially a surgeon, so he decided to drown his ‘stress-anger’ into exercise. Always a fitness icon himself, even today he does two hours of cycling and an hour of gymming. “It helps me concentrate better during my practice and surgery, and also keeps me totally fit” he says.

Few years ago, a doctor was arrested in a typical example of a hyperreactive populist system. This was illegal, but many a times the system gets away with the illegal more fluently than the citizen. Dr. Devendrasingh Paliwal was the president of the local IMA (Indian Medical Association) chapter. He took the system, police and politicos “Head On” as was his nature always. The city’s hospitals shut down. This enraged the politicos but encouraged the medical fraternity to unite like never before, and the doctor, wrongfully in police custody for 8 days, was released!

Dr. Devendra then worked to straighten out the relations with the system, and formulated a “Modus Operandi” involving the police and local politicians to protect the interests of both patients and doctors so that goons and petty politicos do not blackmail either. If only all the IMA chapters follow this lead (and I must also mention the excellent IMA unity and extraordinary leadership in Goa: Dr. Sam Arawattigi, and Kalyan: Dr. Prashant Patil), half the irregularities and injustice against doctors and patients will disappear.

“I have always kept friendship, professional courtesies and Humanity above my medical practice” Devendra says, “I take it for granted that it is my duty to treat free those who cannot pay”.

It is pathetic today to see many brilliant doctors working in perpetual fear under those who exploit them, by choice or in desperation, accepting humiliating and patient-unfriendly working conditions.. People like Dr. Devendrasingh Paliwal are a hope our profession can look upto.

All other things may change, but the value of fitness, courage in one’s heart and a kind nature that compels one to help others are some things which will never change their place as the best three human virtues.

Medical careers are drenched with excess hard work, stress and anxiety. The one training that the doctors in making must inculcate from the beginning is that of physical and mental fitness. Doctors leading a stressful life and always having to present a ‘pleasant face’ to the patients and colleagues, either suffer their negativity alone or pour it out upon their family. Daily physical exercise is an excellent remedy of many frustrations that accompany medical practice. Dr. Devendrasingh Paliwal not only sets an example by doing this, he goes way beyond his duties to bail out others from difficult situations: medical, surgical and social.

I consider myself fortunate that I met this fearless braveheart fitness icon who infused the right “mantras” of courage and fitness into me at the beginning of my medical career!
Much obliged, Dr. Devendrasingh Paliwal!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The King Of Merit

The King Of Merit
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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“My work and my merit is my answer to all my fears” Yashwant Gade replied.

During first year in MBBS I once had a fight with a classmate. We belonged to two different communities, and the student body politics in medical colleges was not very evolved then. Someone tried to blow up the matter into a caste issue.

That is when I first met Yashwant Gade. He was in final MBBS, and I had seen him often engrossed in his books in the library. Curly hair, thin built, and the proud, fearless attitude of a lion. He was involved in most student activities. He listened to me patiently and immediately called my rival from the hostel, resolved our ego problems and averted what could have become an unwanted, ugly memory.

“Both of you are only medical students in this campus. A medical student cannot afford to lose even a single minute. I don’t want to hear about any fights hereafter from either of you” he warned us.
His warm nature and smiling face encouraged us to become his friends. He had the knack of saying things in a straightforward yet wise way. “Aren’t you scared of speaking your mind?” I asked him once.

“My work and my merit is my answer to all my fears” he replied.

Then we gradually realised that we were in the company of an exceptional hero.

He could not afford travelling to the school by bus, so he had walked to and from his school over five kilometres away. He stood first in the Maharashtra state in the 10th standard board exams.

He did not have money to pay the fees for junior college. The management of Shahu college invited him to join them, waiving off his fees. He did them proud when he topped the 12th standard exams in the state.

He topped all three MBBS exams in the Marathwada University. Then he won the open merit post graduate (MS) seat in Orthopaedics. The postgraduates were underpaid and over-utilised then too, but Dr. Yashwant’s younger brother had become an architect by then. He supported by paying for Dr. Yashwant’s fees.

Dr. Yashwant then naturally topped the MS Orthopaedics exam! More importantly, he appeared for the MPSC with non-medical subjects and topped the state in that exam too, in the same year as he topped the MS!

Although a topper throughout his career, the saddest aspect of merit: that it is useless unless one has money enough to sell it, hit him hard. He had no money to start a surgical set up so essential for his practice. Financial insecurity he could not afford then. He decided to do what was needed: enough stability to support the family.

He joined as a deputy collector.
He was posted in dangerous areas away from civil world, and often walked long distances just to eat his meals. He had decided to give it his best, dreaming of setting examples in administration.
It was not to be. The political interference in his work that tied his hands was too much for his self-respect to tolerate. He resigned and returned after two years, and decided to kickstart a new career.

He started working with a friend Dr. Bipin Miniyar.
In a few years, Dr. Yashwant Gade created his own identity in the Orthopedic world, simultaneously working at a government hospital as a teacher, earning his rank as Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Ortho-Oncology in the Government Cancer Hospital at Aurangabad.

In a society running after glamorous stars and scions of rich business houses, where clothes and cars and watches and houses now make a man, the greatness of a lion who fought all odds and tore through all exams to emerge first in every single one of them will appeal only to those who understand the meaning of the word “Merit”. The ability to defeat fate year after year till it has hailed you with the crown of a winner is not given to everyone.

Had he chosen to work in the developed world, I am sure he’d have a private jet by now!

Some egos stink of merit, some of their position, and most with money stink the worst. But even after winning all these three “Oscars” of life, Dr. Yashwant is as simple and down to earth as he was when I met him as a medical student.

Like respect and love, Merit cannot be bought. I am proud to know this ‘King’ of hard work and merit. He is still deep rooted in his background: maintaining a farm and encouraging the rich cultural traditions of an Indian Farmer.

Dr. Yashwant Gade, you are an outstanding role model for any medical student anywhere in the world. You are also the type of icon India desperately needs!

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!

तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!
© राजस देशपांडे

ईमानदारी से अपना काम करते हो,
नेकी से घर चलाकर, परमात्मा को पूजकर
अपने बच्चों को बापू की कहानी सुनाते हो,
पर तुम्हारे पास जबतक वक़्त नहीं है नारे लगाने का..
नेता की जूती को सर आँखों पर रखकर
मेरे चुने देशभक्ति के गीत गाने का…
तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!

मेहनत कर, पढ़ लिख कर देश की सेवा में
पीढ़ी दर पीढ़ी तुम्हारी भले ही वैज्ञानिक बनी हो..
देश विदेश में भले ही तुम्हरी बुद्धि, और कला
देश की गरिमा-सी सराही जाती हो
पर तुम्हारे पास जबतक वक़्त नहीं है नारे लगाने का..
नेता की जूती को सर आँखों पर रखकर
मेरे चुने देशभक्ति के गीत गाने का…
तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!

सीमा पर लड़ता हर स्वाभिमानी जवान भले ही
लड़ रहा हो देश की खातिर, मेरी तुम्हारी खातिर,
तुम्हारे मन में भी उसके प्रति हो भाई-भगवान सी भावना
पर तुम्हारे पास जबतक वक़्त नहीं है नारे लगाने का..
नेता की जूती को सर आँखों पर रखकर
मेरे चुने देशभक्ति के गीत गाने का…
तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!

लाखों मरीजों को भले ही तुम ज़िन्दगी देते हो
करोड़ों विद्यार्थियों को पाठशाला में अपनेही बच्चों जैसे
बढ़ाते पढ़ाते हो, नेकी की राह और देशप्रेम सिखलाते हो
पर तुम्हारे पास जबतक वक़्त नहीं है नारे लगाने का..
नेता की जूती को सर आँखों पर रखकर
मेरे चुने देशभक्ति के गीत गाने का…
तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!

इंसान को रंगों में बांटकर, तलवार छुरी चलाकर
इतिहास का बदला जबतक वर्तमान से लेते नहीं हो,
तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!
उबले खून की जवान नस्लों को गजरे बाँध
सोने में लथपथ लार टपकाना सिखाते नहीं हो..
तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!
भेड़ बकरियों की तरह ऊँगली उठने पर सलाम नहीं करते हो..
तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!

शिवाजी, सरदार और नानक के देश का शेर होकर भी
तुम्हारे पास जबतक वक़्त नहीं है नारे लगाने का..
नेता की जूती को सर आँखों पर रखकर
देशभक्ति के गीत गाने का…तुम देशभक्त नहीं हो सकते!
राजस देशपांडे
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The Epic Struggle Against Epilepsy

The Epic Struggle Against Epilepsy

(C) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

In a war-torn city, she kept on having fits almost every other day: convulsions and seizures of different types. 21 years old and home-bound, she had suffered with epilepsy since childhood. Dreams of a beautiful life that must adorn the life of a young woman were shattered due to a devastating and humiliating illness.

Her elder brother could not bear to see her suffer. He decided to take risks and enquired. Someone told him to take his sister to India for treatment. The airports in his country were destroyed or closed. All doors to India appeared locked.

Without any clues about future, he took her by sea to a nearby country Djibouti, a small African country. From there they traveled to Ethiopia. Then to Kenya. Finally they reached Mumbai and searched for the lone contact they hoped to meet: Mr. Abdul Aleem Alakeli, who works free to help patients. That was two months ago.

She reacted badly to two of the best medicines used for treating epilepsy, but their faith and determination were extraordinary. The brother and the sister had made a final decision: come whatever may, they wanted to defeat epilepsy.

Today as they left with complete control of seizures, I told the sister what she already knew: that she had an extraordinary brother. I congratulated her for her strong will power too.
Her brother was smiling after a long time, and her pride was obvious.

We wish her and her brother the most beautiful and healthiest life ahead. May God bless them and ensure their safety on the way and back home.

(C) Dr. Rajas Deshpande15622112_1172439906184669_2495525607074222032_n.jpg

The Mysterious Blessing

The Mysterious Blessing
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Years ago, one aged Sadhu / saint with long white beard came to the casualty at around 3 AM for an injury caused by a four wheeler. He was walking by the roadside, when someone’s uncontrolled jeep had hit his hand and sped away. He had a big bleeding cut in his arm and forearm. The lone young disciple accompanying the Sadhu was crying, but calm. The sadhu was smiling.

The medical officer on duty was too tired to wake up, and lost his patience. “Why don’t you take rest at night, Babaji?” he shouted at the Sadhu, and then told me, an intern then, to clean and dress the wound. The disciple carefully took away the Sadhu’s belongings: a cotton sling-bag, begging bowl, a Damru (two-headed hand drum), and a flute. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

As I cleaned the wound and stitched it after using some anaesthetic, the Sadhu’s smile did not change. I knew he had severe pain.
“Isn’t that painful?” I asked.
“Very painful, but now I feel better” he replied “God bless you”.
“We need to file a medico-legal case. Did you see the vehicle number?” I asked him.
“I have no complaints about anything. Neither the one who hit me, nor I run this world. The one who does will take care” the Sadhu said without any bitterness, and kept his hand on his disciple’s shoulder. “I am all right” he reassured the sobbing disciple. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The casualty ward boy brought my tea just then, and I requested him to get tea and some water for those two too. There was no one else waiting. Nights make us all better human beings for sure.

As they started to leave, I touched their feet. It was just an etiquette, out of respect for age and renunciation. I was just starting out as a doctor, and I was amazed at his pain tolerance and patience. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“What do you want? What shall I pray?” he smiled as he raised his wounded hand to bless me.
Never be ashamed to be honest, I knew. “I am waiting for my MD, a postgraduate seat. Please bless me for that”

I felt the irony of what was going on. But sometimes when life’s problems are beyond thinking’s domain to resolve, you don’t think: you just flow. Those times often become the most iconic memories of your life.

He kept his hand upon my head and said “My son, you already have what you want. Stop searching”.

Then, something out of the world happened.
As I got up, that Sadhu touched my feet. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Red with embarrassment and bewildered, I was too dumbstruck to speak.

“This is for the work you do” he said, and took out something from his bag. Placing it in my hand, he said “You treated me with the same love as you’d treat your own. There’s nothing more than that to learn in this world. May your life be blessed with the same love”.

As I stared at the big Rudraksha in my hand, they walked away into the dawn.

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

PS: This is a real story. I am rather spiritual than religious, do not believe in most superstitions, but I do not also consider myself enough knowledgeable to take for granted that what I know now or for that matter what science knows today is final. As a doctor, there is no other choice than to think only scientific. But to choose only to be a doctor is optional.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The Arabic Gratitude

When a patient from Arabic world is happy, he hugs you and kisses you too! However much unused to we are for such a gesture, it wipes away all the dust off one ‘s mind and rejuvenates the spirit of every doctor, to thank God once again for considering one eligible for this responsibility.

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Happiness Is

Happiness Is:
A thirteen years old sweet fighter coming over to gift something she made with such affection for her doctor 😀 Thank you, Kanika Kesri.
Delighted & obliged with your gesture🙏🏻.15403864_727777090704871_7134881359160639060_o

The Sparkling Surreal

The Sparkling Surreal
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
If someone had asked me “Which is the one Last pen you will buy if you could buy only one pen in life, price no bar?, I had a ready answer since over a decade:
The MontBlanc Writers series Franz Kafka Limited Edition.
 
Dark wine red and silver, subtly changing its shape from round to square, this great pen is based upon the concept of the novel “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka. One of the greatest authors who cut open the chains of human imagination and took it beyond the realm of acceptability, often touching the borders of naked reality, much of Franz Kafka’s work was published after him.
 
The king of Surrealism (often referred to as “literature in the dream state,” where a different kind of logic or non-logic prevails), Franz Kafka feared that people would find him mentally and physically repulsive. However, those who met him found him to possess a quiet and cool demeanour, obvious intelligence, and a dry sense of humour; they also found him boyishly handsome, although of austere appearance.
 
The term “Kafkaesque” which evolved to mean nightmarishly complex, bizarre, and illogical (something that is even today beyond daring to express) is now commonly used, although it may mean ‘suggestive of Franz Kafka’s work’.
 
Reality is too Kafkaesque to express as it is, hence Kafka.
Extremely rare, exquisite, and a heavenly beauty to fall in love with! Please do not ask me the price.
 
Thank you, MontBlanc, for this pen!
 
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Maharashtra Medical Council (MMC) Elections: An Opinion

Maharashtra Medical Council (MMC) Elections: An Opinion
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
I can shut up. In that case please do not read this post.
Or I can open up my heart.

At the outset, I am not writing this for any panel.
Many panels have been formed. While the IMA panel has the “apolitical” background so essential for the medical fraternity, it has in the past given jitters to medical practitioners by making controversial statements to the media against its own members. It has the benefit of a history of impartial work for allopaths, but needs to reaffirm a stronger face and stand in favour of the practitioners rather than working for limelight.

While apolitical is the best choice, it also lacks the essential strength to garner the support of the lawmakers (read political will), hence the panels associated with political outfits have an advantage. But the same rule applies in the negative: that the chosen candidates from such panels will have a tough time standing against their own party should it try and implement some idiotic populist rules / laws. Only those candidates who have respect and backing of the strongmen in their supporting party will make a difference.

In a society with predominant negative opinion of the medical profession, and amidst media largely interested in finding trivial faults of the medical practitioners and blowing up tiny issues, the MMC members must stop making statements that tarnish the image of this troubled profession, and pretending “holier than thou” to others.
A unified effort to come out strongly to protect the allopaths from the assault of various political / social / federal forces which want to enslave this profession to be able to use it as a tool to impress the masses to hide their own inefficiency, by making populist statements and laws has become the need of the hour. Any candidate who stands for this is the right candidate we need in MMC.

While credit point system is an ultramodern and justified idea, its marriage to a slow and inadequate system / execution created the necessity to attend unnecessary CMEs, waste precious holidays and increase (hidden) dependence on the pharma sector for travel, food and stay. In the era of hi speed internet and satellite meetings, the very idea of physical presence away from the practicing hospital or home is ridiculous. This idea should have been implemented only when the MMC acquired ability to practically provide online relevant CMEs for every specialty. The whole process of thousands of doctors traveling out for conferences for which the patient ultimately pays does not really achieve the expected “learning” benefit. Think of the millions of doctor-hours and rupees wasted.

The general issues must be treated as primary points upon which each candidate must clarify his / her stand without ambiguity and party policy:
*Crosspathy,
*Everyone (hospitals, quacks, alternative pathies and TDH) being allowed to advertise except the registered and qualified allopath,
*The non-accountability of medical ethics / practices at some hospitals, the exploitation and harassment of qualified doctors by some hospitals,
*The fake clinical trials, and PG diplomas/ degrees
*The open defamation or suspension-without-enquiry of any allopath against whom complaint is lodged by revengeful patients / relatives / politicos
*Fighting the unfair draconian clauses in the regulations like PCPNDT at all levels
*Provision of free legal backing to registered candidates
and filing defamation suits against false complainants against medical professionals
*Fighting for the autonomy of the National Medical Commission and its governance by Medical specialists and Judges only, without political interference / controls.

The contesting candidates must also comment about the specialty specific issues like those of Pathologists, Radiologists, OBGYN, Intensivists etc.
Human rights regulations about working hours of doctors including residents, PGs should be defined and implemented by the MMC, this alone can encourage the govt to fill up empty posts at medical colleges and hospitals, and to stop overuse of existing staff.

Renewal of Medical teachers’ and Medical Officers’ registrations should be automatic: teaching should get credit points, and so should working in rural areas.
My appeal will be to vote for individuals rather than panels. We must choose candidates who have done significant constructive work for the fraternity. Many of my dear friends are contesting this election from different panels, and I know candidates from every panel who have spent years adding to the grace of our profession, fighting for its dignity.

The last thing medical professionals can afford at this moment is a fraternity divided further. Let the differences among the panels NOT be the cause of differences within the fraternity.

Dr. Pradeep Benjarge is the only one name I will mention in this post, because he is an independent candidate, we have all witnessed his relentless struggle over a decade to fight injustice against medical professionals and hospitals. I have reserved one vote for him.

There are some candidates who have worked hard over past many years to safeguard the interest and image of medical profession. Their work will of course reward them. There are some newcomers who want to change the existing uncertainty and insecurity among the allopaths. My sincere best wishes to them too.

One request: whichever panel they contest from, the candidates must work together for the fraternity rather than carrying the “panel title” to the MMC. We need strong fighters who will unite like soldiers of different religions, to protect the nobility of their profession. Doctors can be excellent politicians (and devastating often), but this ground is not for the show of might.

MMC should be a round table of scientific minded intellectuals with strong integrity.

My best wishes to every candidate! May the best men and women win to the “MMC Panel”.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
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Naked Cavemen, Einstein and Calvin Klein

Naked Cavemen, Einstein and Calvin Klein
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Lower courts give judgements. Higher courts change them. Higher courts give judgements, other benches change them. Government fights with courts. All of them work less than 8 hours (few exceptions) and have sumptuous vacations. Judges without medical training will decide about medico-legal cases. But any of them do not require exams to improve performance or to deliver better in spite of huge backlogs. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Almost in every government office, in most departments controlled by them, bribery is a rule rather than exception. Piles of files do not move, pensioners die without pension and farmers commit suicides. But the concerned authorities who work 8 hours per day do not need any corrective courses or exams to assess their performance, to compare where the developed world is today.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
In most of the healthcare facilities run by governments, there are severe deficiencies: no appointments of doctors, no proper salaries, no facilities or backups, no security, and worst of all, no vision. But the people who are responsible for making these policies do not need any training, assessment or exams. The very people who want youngest generations of doctors to provide world class medical services to rural India do not want to change their decade old failing policies.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
The thousands of practicing Babas, Gurus, Quacks who are officially seen tied up with the highest of the land and bash the allopathic and scientific medicines spreading poison in the society do not need any exams to preach or practice. The lawmakers who do not ban tobacco, alcohol, helmetless driving, the people who eat unhealthy and mistreat themselves or family do not need any exams. The transport offices that issue driving licences to unfit drivers do not need training or exams.
We see many military men and out of respect treat them free. They are so patriotic that they seldom expect anything in return from the country. But they often relate how bad the conditions are for them and their families. There is a crop of people who quote the military sacrifices as if it was their own credit! Those who are responsible for the upgradations in facilities for the military personnel do not still need any exams.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
There are deaths due to hunger and malnourishment. But the ones who are in a position to change this by making right laws do not need any exams. Illegal buildings are erected, labourers die when they collapse, but the concerned professionals do not need exams or assessment.
547 extremely responsible and respected representatives who waste the public money in daily crores over a month due to ego issues, not being able to come together in the interest of the nation to resolve issues, blaming it all upon each other do not need any exams to assess their performance.
But the actual allopathic doctor, who has stood highest merits in all exams, stayed on the top of the competition to earn his / her degree late in life, all of whose exams had 50 percent as passing limit as opposed to 35 percent in all other professions, who has sacrificed family life, sleep and food for over 10-15 years just for learning, who works almost 24/365 and solves health problems on a daily basis, updates his / her knowledge with CMEs, stays in touch with the latest and delivers it to the poorest of the poor with equal affection, carries the country’s failed healthcare upon his / her shoulder is not good enough for them! Now they want the allopath to appear for exams lifelong, suspecting that his / her knowledge is still not enough good for them, even after the CMEs.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
If the millions of doctors are forced to give exams repeatedly all their life, they will happily do so (for they are not afraid of exams). But this will take away billions of doctor-hours out of service (exam leaves) in an already failing healthcare system, will tax the patient more, will open up new channels of corruption and another universe of chaos will add itself to India. Who cares? The ruling mood seems to be ”Patients will die, patients will pay”.
The current CMEs are world standard, do not tax patients, and enough effective. But our system seems to want “better than the developed-world class of doctors”.
This is like the stone-age naked cavemen asking Einstein and Calvin Klein to appear for yearly exams to stay updated for serving them.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
PS 1: The nicer you are, the worse your troubles. Doctors must unite upon an apolitical platform to fight stupid laws being proposed.
PS 2 For those who are not able to think beyond medical malpractices and corruption, please make an effort to understand that there are other issues in medical practice, and this post is not about money.
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