Monthly Archives: March 2017

The Oxygen Allergy

The Oxygen Allergy
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Read the news of a doctor being brutally beaten up again. Both the things sadden the soul: the death of a patient, and the suffering and irreversible loss of an eye of a young doctor. But what hurts most is the shameless absence of reactions from the political giants, elite ones in and out of the profession who otherwise burn the social media with philosophy about wisdom, Indian Culture, and improving medical practice. The inadequate standing up of the medical bodies also adds gloom to the big picture: the organisations which should bring the medical care to a standstill, not as a punishment to someone, but as a desperate stand for survival and security have only been able to generate a lukewarm response.

Where are those who write that the whole medical profession is corrupt? Why haven’t those who added to the social poisons speaking about how people act and react to doctors, especially the young dynamic ones dealing with emergencies at the forefront, beaten up, disabled and scarred for life because they chose to serve the very people who do not have enough brains to understand that the doctor was trying to help? © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

A boy of 15 is given a sports bike by parents. No helmet. Drives rash. Traffic control not adequate. Indisciplined traffic. The boy has an unfortunate accident. Lies bleeding on the spot for over an hour, people don’t even stop to help. No services for such victims to be taken to hospital on priority. Brought to casualty late. Doctors try their best. Unfortunately, the victim dies.

The doctor is beaten up. Not the parents who allowed him a bike without proper training, without helmet, not the indisciplined traffickers, not the traffic control systems, not the onlookers who did not help him in time, not the administration which fails to make ambulances available on priority for traffic accidents. Only the doctor who was helping out is beaten up.

The media, most politicians, the social elites, the police, the judiciary, the Netas or the administration: no one cares to speak against this unfair treatment of doctors, and such is the condition all over India.

Even the many seniormost doctors who have great social and governmental influence seem to be too preoccupied to stand for their junior generations. The real tragedy is those senior doctors who continue to sermon junior doctors to “communicate well” with angry, illiterate patients and relatives, themselves hiding from the ground zero. Some senior doctors also appear to take pride in projecting the junior doctors faulty / guilty, in a pathetic attempt to appear taller than they really are. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The mandate is clear: the junior doctors, especially the emergency / casualty and critical care service providing younger doctors should now form their own dynamic organization, make rules for proper patient care and communication, follow them, and at the same time form a countrywide network to stop functioning in case any doctor is beaten up anywhere in India. The existing associations have failed to achieve that. The administrations should know that ESMA can only be invoked when they can guarantee protection of the staff involved. One cannot force a doctor to risk life at the hands of a violent mob, under the threat of ESMA. The same courts which enforce availability of a doctor for every emergency must also ensure the protection of every such doctor.

It is common Indian knowledge that our society is too mannerless to understand the language of decency. People pee under the notices of where not to pee, and enjoy the movie scenes showing that. In the famous scene from that movie “Yashwant”, the good Inspector feeds the criminal and asks politely if he has committed the crime, but the criminal accepts it only after he is threatened and slapped. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

If someone thinks that the language of silent protests, black bands, signature campaigns (btw, are there still people among us who do not understand the scams in such campaigns?) will work, they should rethink. The only thing that will be understood is shutdown of all medical services at least in the region / state where violence against doctors is not proactively prevented or punished.
Next time one hears a leader / politico / minister advising high handedly to doctors about their duties, about social service, whichever the platform, please muster enough courage to stand up and ask them about their actions in cases of violence against doctors.

It is said that a human being cannot have allergy to oxygen, as it is essential for life. Some elements in our society are starting to cultivate an anti-doctor sentiment. That will be as stupid as cultivating an allergy to oxygen. Without doctors, how does the society expect to have medical care so essential? What will beating up doctors achieve? What is law meant for?

We have come a long way proving our merit. It is high time we prove our unity and strength. This will happen only if junior doctors form a strong association.

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Please share unedited

The Living Phoenix

The Living Phoenix
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
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“Stop treating me as if I am only a woman!” she told the bank manager, who probably did not grasp the meaning of that sentence. Little did he know who he was dealing with.
Sharon Harmon Muir is a lady to beat most men. Right from Religion to Depression, she has fought her battles with the determination to win. She indeed won them, including her last battle with suicidal-level depression.
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4 years ago I met her with her husband Harry Muir, for some mild memory issues which turned out to be the symptoms of severe stress and depression. As she revealed the details of her life, I realized what an extraordinary life she had been living. When analyzing her own thinking and her art (painting), she said things that made me realize her genius.
I gave her a compliment I had rarely used: “You are one of the most brilliant minds I ever met”.She laughed aloud, looked at her husband, and winked “I told ya!”. Mr Harry was only too happy and proud.
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Sharon was born in South USA to parents who were mill workers. She started her theatre performances at the age of 13. She sold her first painting at the age of 15. She was actively involved in civil rights movement. Once while service in the church, a black couple was denied entry in the church. Sharon quit organized religion that day, protesting against racial prejudice.
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She went to an all-male institute of design and technology, University of North Carolina and later started teaching men at the same center to use power tools and build theater sets (That was in the 1960s!). She studied various art forms, ballet, composing music, painting and much more, also working as an electrician.

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She says: my job profile was easy: whatever anyone could not do, I offered to do it for them. Working at such odd jobs, she met Harry Muir, who was a political protester within the US army. As Harry was jailed, Sharon’s family opposed the marriage. She was even labeled “carni-trash” then. Together Sharon and Harry worked as college professors, musicians, fine artists, magicians, and stood for each other. Sharon got an excellent corporate job, so Harry decided to complement it by choosing to be a house-husband, cooking and serving and looking after their daughter, and when the daughter went to school, he spent his time as a street singer.
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At the age of 50, during menopause, the first attack of depression struck Sharon. In her own words, “It wasn’t me who was sad and suicidal, it was like someone else within me. I fought those thoughts, I knew I had to overcome this”. She developed severe panic attacks that prevented her from going out of their home. So she trained a Scottish terrier who would stop the traffic for her, take her to a safe place and then find Harry!They reached India in search of spirituality, finding it at Meherabad, and settled there. She continued to work as a painter and musician. “I was lucky that I could be the head of the family” she comments, although every time she speaks of Harry now, her voice becomes tender.
Once on a flight from Atlanta to Paris, Harry collapsed and was resuscitated. He was shifted to an ICU in Paris from the airport, and was diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis (shrinking and progressive failure of lungs) of unknown origin. A few weeks later, they returned to India. In January 2016, Harry suddenly collapsed and passed away while in a hospital. Sharon kept on resuscitating her life partner of 50 years, till the hospital staff arrived after 8-10 minutes. She cannot forget that trauma.
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With this loss, her depression resurfaced again, stronger than ever.
The worst loss in life is not death, it is the loss of love. Once more, suicidal thoughts and severe depression engulfed Sharon. To be left alone in a foreign country at the age of 67 is not easy.
“My belief system is very strong. I know my intelligence is above average, so there was no reason I couldn’t do everything I wanted, if I just put my mind to it” she tells how she decided to overcome her depression. “I read about it all I could, tried to get help, and got it”. She is thankful for getting good medical help in India, although she adds with a wink “I didn’t want a doctor who pats my back and laughs aloud telling me not to worry. I wanted a doctor who understands me, my illness and my worries as well”.
After Harry’s death, she had to clear a lot of legal hassles and banking formalities. Her daughter helped her there. When one bank manager tried to behave high-handed thinking that she’s just a woman unable to cope up, she told him : “Stop treating me as if I am only a woman!”.
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When she visited me recently, she laughed a lot and told me: “This time again, I have chosen to defeat my depression. I will never give up. Back to life now”.
I usually keep busy, but when some patients talk, I want to listen to the beauty they create in my life. They expand my mindscape. When I asked Sharon what was her favorite subject for painting, she answered with a mysterious smile: “I paint the colors of the spirits of places”.
As I drank in the beauty of that sentence, I realized that the soul of this extraordinary woman can only have one title: “Phoenix”. The legendary bird is not imaginary, so long as we meet people like Sharon. This great magician called nature has given us the magical ability to be everything we want to be, to be happy, to win over any challenges we might face, just with a small trick: wanting to do it.
Sharon is an extraordinary example of that magic.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Thank you, Sharon Harmon Muir, for the permission to share the story of your extraordinary life.

Please share unedited for spreading awareness about fighting depression.

The Sacred Duty of A Man

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The Sacred Duty of A Man

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

One night after the ward rounds, just as I left the hospital, I received an urgent call. The patient, a lady in her late 50s, had become comatose. She was admitted three days ago under a colleague for bleeding in the left side of her brain, that had caused right sided paralysis. She was drowsy since admission, but that day she had some vomitings and then became deeply unconscious.

She was already in the ICU. The most common reasons for drowsiness in admitted population above 50 years of age is either medicines or low sodium levels. Her sodium was very low, we started the treatment.

Her elderly husband walked up to me as I came out of the ICU. Extremely worried, but still maintaining his calm, he asked me “Will my wife be okay?”

I explained him the situation, and reassured him that though there was no threat to her life then, the recovery from paralysis was unpredictable.

“That is okay doctor, but she must survive. We don’t have any children, she has looked after me all her life. I will do anything for her” he said with a heavy voice.

They came from a village 5 hours away from Pune. Mr. Arvind Gandhi was a retired pharmacist, surviving on his savings, with his wife Mrs. Aparna, till this calamity hit them.

That was four years ago.

Since then, he became her complete attendant and caretaker. He took care of her in that bedridden state for over a year, cleaning her and feeding her many times every day. He took her regularly every day for physiotherapy, and brought her for consultation to Pune as frequently as required. He learnt taking care of home, cooking, housekeeping etc., and never shied from the medical expenses although his sources were limited. Thanks to his extreme dedication to her care and extraordinary will power, Mrs Aparna Gandhi has now recovered enough to independently carry out her daily routine, and also helps her husband in cooking and other tasks.

“When I saw my wife in that condition, I was heartbroken. Then I thought, it is my duty as a man to fight for and take care of the woman I married. I changed overnight and decided to win this situation rather than giving up or asking for help”. Mr. Arvind said today when they followed up.

“Looking at his dedication and love for me, and his effort to make me recover, I developed a willpower too, and decided to recover and take care of him again” his wife replied with a smile.

As doctors we commonly see that many men treat their wife and her health problems as ‘not so important” issues. Many in fact drop their wife to her parents’, to be treated and sent back after the ‘repair’. Many take it for granted that the lady’s parents should pay for all her medical expenses even after years of marriage. In fact, many even compel their sick wives to continue with cooking, housekeeping etc. shamelessly claiming that there is no option. There are no laws about any of these.

We also come across such rare ones like Mr. Arvind Gandhi, who fight with the fate with all they have with the simple yet golden mentality of caring for the woman who cares for them. All men are thankfully not the same, and there indeed are simple and humble men like Mr. Arvind Gandhi who set examples of what a man should be. In the growing market of meaty and arty men flaunting everything except culture and kindness, these examples are easily drowned. Hence this article.

While many pundits fight for the correct definitions of life and love, let us congratulate Mr. Arvind and Mrs. Aparna Gandhi for their extraordinary struggle, willpower and the victory.

©. Dr. Rajas Deshpande

PS:

Thank you Mr. & Mrs. Gandhi for permission to share this story.

Please share unedited.

Convocation Speech at KEM Hospital and SGS Medical College Mumbai Dr. Rajas Deshpande.

Guest of Honor at KEM Hospital & SGSMC
Batch 2011 Convocation 28thFebruary 2017

Convocation Speech Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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Respected teachers and

My dear friends,

This prestigious institute, KEM Hospital, has given me two identities: that of a Neurologist and also as a Medical Activist as a MARD President. This is my home away from home. I am glad that my most beloved professor Dr. Pravina Shah is here today, she had dusted and polished many fortunate students like myself.
This is the same campus where I waited with my father over 25 years ago, he was very anxious then whether I will get my MBBS admission or not. I desperately wish my father was here today to witness this event. The point is, my dear colleagues, never forget the sacrifices of those who marched you here. In the race for making a glorious medical career, many sacrifices are required, but parents, spouse and children are an equal duty, never to be neglected.

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Evolution in our field will require you to stand up to extensive digitalisation and explosions of information. Rather than drowning yourself while coping up, please make sure you don’t retain the unnecessary information or statistics that can be easily pulled up. Instead, we must regularly update the most necessary skills and tools of every successful doctor: a perfect clinical examination, surgical skills, communication, correct documentation and medico-legal awareness. It is also wise to check drug interactions and adverse effects of every drug you use, and obtain a second opinion in every doubtful case.

Students often ask me what is the number one essential of a good doctor: the undoubted answer is concentration: upon studying, listening, upon examination, analysing and concluding. One of the greatest threats to our profession today is the disturbance created by cell-phones. Please take care that your practice is not polluted with such digital disturbance.

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Friends, now a days patients are helplessly prejudiced about our profession. We must take this situation in our stride and start each consultation with an aim to change this pseudo-perception. We must understand the extreme anxiety of a patient in waiting room, an anxiety not only about a bad diagnosis but also about the expenses, time, loss of career and family that often pushes the patients and relatives to the brink of a breakdown. Add a callous doctor, and things deteriorate. Even if your prior patient has been insulting, aggressive or trust less, the next patient still deserves the best doctor within you. Patients often complain about doctors not having simple manners, this can be easily corrected. As for the continuous questions about malpractices and cut practices, I know that no one here has entered this profession with a bad aim, we just need a strong willpower to stay away from wrong lanes. Here in front of us are the glorious examples of spotless heights in medical careers.

Each one of you has already proven his / her intellectual mettle. It is indeed divine and rewarding to be a doctor, but you must also have a diversion that brings you immense peace. That avoids piling up of stress and routine which is so inevitable in medical practice. I found my solace in writing which brought me here today, in Fountain pens, in music and in teaching. Please make an effort to find your solace to overcome stress.

My worst pain about our profession today is that we neither have a strong unity nor a strong face. I urge this batch to please start a new tradition: to stay united, connected and to always stand for each other. In a poor and illiterate society jealous of anyone earning well, especially doctors, we must know how to present and explain the functioning of a doctor and hospital, the hardships, sacrifices and the emotional drain involved. I have attempted that in my book, ‘The Doctor Gene’.

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My friends, I congratulate and thank you all for having me over here. I think that during the convocation I should be sitting there in those chairs: and listening to your thoughts, because you have more dreams today than me, you have more opportunities to learn, more years with in this glorious tradition called medicine, better technology, better treatments and cures cures, and above all more success waiting for yourself in future.

I will gladly trade all my earnings and success to dream like you again, to sit once more in those chairs today, and to hold that super-precious degree in my hands with a pride that has no equal.
Take care, stay united and God Bless You All.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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