When Money Rained In Our Hospital

When Money Rained In Our Hospital

©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

On a beautiful September midnight, I was studying in the medical college library, as the exam term had started. It was that pre-exam phase when the futility, cruelty, and stupidity of exam system hurts most, and new poetry starts stemming in one’s brain when trying to study difficult medical concepts. But that night was a pleasant exception. My gorgeous tall colleague with curly hair was besides me in the library. She had come in from a famous private hospital in Mumbai for studying with me (seriously), and I was drenched in the pleasure of her company, because we got along very well together. We divided topics, studied and taught each other, the whole process made learning Neurology so much more beautiful! She was brilliant and madder than me in her attempts to “know everything”about what we studied. ©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

At about 2 AM, we went out for a small ride on my Yamaha RX100 to Dadar station, where a tea vendor on a bicycle used to serve a tea that could possibly wake up dead brains. It was raining lightly, and the whole atmosphere was filled up with a sort of Kenny G’s ‘Songbird’. She sat huddled behind me on the bike, as we sipped tea in the silence of that atmosphere. It was more beautiful than anything we could speak.

Just then, the cellphone rang. I was on call, there was some emergency. Thanks to the RX100, I reached hospital campus in nearly three minutes. I dropped my friend at the library, and went towards the casualty. There was a huge crowd. Many patients were being brought in, some severely injured, some unconscious, most bleeding, crying and shocked. The atmosphere was filled with anger and wails of relatives frantically seeking medical help for their patients. Manyresident doctors from different specialties were trying to deal with the situation.

A building under construction near the hospital had collapsed. Over 8 labourers sleeping there had died, many were badly injured. Sirens kept sounding as ambulances brought new cases. Just then, a different siren sounded, with a lot of police whistles. A local elected politician had come in his red-light car, surrounded by bodyguards. The seniormost doctor was summoned by the authorities acompanying the politico. ©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“Make sure everybody gets the right treatment. Don’t let any complaint arise. Keep mum, we will provide all the help you need” the Politico told the casualty in charge.

“But Sir we do not have enough beds or staff to handle this. Many will need blood, antibiotics which we have long ago requested but we havent received yet” the casualty in-charge said.

“Just shut up and give a list of what is required right now, we will arrange. Make sure that media is not allowed inside the hospital” said the Politico.

Then he gestured his assistant, who opened a bag and pulled out bundles of 1000 rupees notes. The politico went from bed to bed of the injured and the dead, placed one note in the hand of the patient or the relative, and whispered “I am with you. Don’t worry. We have ordered the hospital to treat you completely free. If you need anything please tell me directly. Don’t speak with anyone else”. If anyone spoke angrily, a few more notes were thrusted in their hands.

One elderly labourer, whose son was unconscios and bleeding with a head injury, started shouting “They killed my son. We had told them that building was unsafe. They forced him to stay there. I will go to the police”etc. The politico’s assistants took him aside, and whispered something in his ear. He returned sobbing, but he did not shout anymore. ©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The next day, there were headlines. They covered the pictures of the rubble of the building, the dead bodies, the injured, the shocked relatives, and the patients in the hospital. They wrote praises about how the local politico rushed and helped the victims, again with pictures. There was no mention of the efforts made by the doctors who had saved many lives that night. But what was most shocking was that there never was any mention of whose building it was, who was responsible for the gross neglect in safety precautions, who owned the construction. Many had died, many were injured, but there was no blaming anyone. A case was apparently filed with the police, but no labourer came forward to complain. Money chokes many a throat, poverty sometimes desperately seeks that choke.

Thousands of people, especially the poor and helpless, die in India almost every day due to the gross inadequacies and negligence of many authorities: transport, travel, aviation, road safety, building construction, food quality, school health are areas where there are glaring blunders sometimes costing people their lives. Traffic accidents are conveniently blamed upon drivers. Unclean food, drugs being licensed are a horrible reality. Mosquitoes and malaria, dengue cause hundreds of deaths every month. Yet no press is seen “investigating” where to pin the blame. No court orders suo moto enquiries in traffic accidents of bridge / construction collapses that kill many. Railway accidents are considered an ill fate. Those victims who raise voice against this probably face the threat of never receiving the compensation or financial aid. ©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Except when someone dies in a hospital, however serious they may have been. Then the whole world knows who to blame, punish or exploit. If a doctor or hospital had committed a mistake, the headlines would be totally different. The names of doctors who spent a lifetime saving lives would be painted in black within a moment, they would be labelled villains and murderers!

I could only meet my friend three nights later. When I told her the details of how money rained, she uttered a word about that politico. A word that was shocking, but perfect. I told you, we got along very well together! Of the many beautiful nocturnal rides and adventures in my life, the memories of that one night when money rained in my hospital come back to haunt me everytime I read of a new tragedy that kills people due to someone’s fault. What happens later is still the same though. Nothing has changed.

©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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