Diagnose This Indian Disease

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“Doctor, we had gone to the UK” the patient’s husband was telling me, “What an advanced world that is! Extremely clean and very systematic! People are so well mannered, everyone is respectfully treated. So many facilities… and there’s no pollution at all! I think that world is at least thirty years ahead of us.”

His wife was an extremely complicated case of a subtype of Parkinson’s disease, under my treatment for over three years now.

“I agree”I replied, and I meant it, although it somehow felt sad about it.

“By the way, doc,” he continued hesitantly, “while we were there our son had taken an appointment with the best Neurologist there. Actually we had to pay 250 Pounds, but we thought we could use the opportunity to get a second opinion. We met the doctor there and showed your papers. He checked the patient and advised us to repeat all the tests. He confirmed the same diagnosis and asked us to continue the same medicines given by you, and said there’s nothing more to be done. I am sorry, we completely trust you, but our son insisted on a second opinion. Now we will continue to follow up with you”. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

I smiled and replied “I am absolutely not offended. A second opinion is a patient’s right and we all exist for the patient. I am happy that the neurologist there has agreed with the current diagnosis and treatment. The only problem is that you had to pay twenty three thousand rupees just for that one consultation ”.

“That was only for the consultation, doc! We paid separately for all the tests” his voice picked up.

Almost every patient who seeks medical care and treatment in the advanced world has experienced that things are easier, faster and cheaper in India when medical treatment is concerned. While Indian doctors may be equal to those in the western world, the technology definitely lags behind because of the red-tapism and taxation, the expectation of charity (and thereby socio-political misuse) from every investment. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande.

While the Western world is decades ahead of India, most medical specialists in India is at par with the western world, and are available at a far lower cost to almost everyone. Faster appointments, much faster turnout of investigations and reporting (probably the best in the world), diagnosis and treatment is something every Indian and especially administrations should be proud of. It takes months to get appointments with the specialist, for MRIs, and for treatments too in most cases outside India, so many from the advanced world actually travel to India for medical treatment. The costs are extremely high in most world, so are insurance premiums, and doctor’s salaries.

All the credit of this medical advance in India goes to the private medical practitioners and institutes, corporate hospitals. Yet most Indians speak in derogatory terms about them. Deliberate attempts of fault finding, accusations of greed and malpractice by politicians, society and media, allegations about medical colleagues by the dissatisfied, unsuccessful practitioners and seekers of quick fame, and an environment of perpetual mistrust and legal action has really made practising difficult for many Indian doctors. Still, we have the best turnaround time and accuracy at lowest costs. Some day someone sane in the administration will hopefully realise this.

When I handed over the prescription to the patient, the husband winked at me “Doctor, I am a pensioner old man. My son made me spend for all the medical in UK, as he had no insurance cover. Can you give us some senior citizen concession?”

Like every Indian doctor who accomodates every Indian patient, I did!

What do you call the condition where you do your best for someone, but the expectations of more never cease at the other end?

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Neurologist

Pune/ Mumbai

Please share unedited

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