Say, doc!

Say, doc!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“Doc, may I eat fruits?”
“Yes”
“Papaya?”
“Yes”
“Apple?”
“You can eat all fruits.”
“Banana also?”
“Yes”
“But I get vomiting after eating banana..”
“Then don’t eat banana”
“But you just said I can eat all fruits “
“I’m sorry, please eat only what you tolerate well. Anything else?”

Next patient.

“Till the time we finalise and treat the cause of your unconsciousness episodes, please don’t drive any vehicle “ I told the twenty year old girl whose family stood surrounding her dipped in worry.

Since after a head injury during riding, the patient had had fits. She continued to ride her moped to her college inspite of strict warnings by doctors not to drive. This time she was admitted because she had fallen from her bike as she had a fit while riding.

“How will she go to the college then?” asked her angry mother.

“You will have to make alternative arrangements” I replied.

“Can she drive a four wheeler?” asked her father.

“No”. I now understood that they didn’t want to understand the risk.

“Three wheeler?” asked a relative who had the most common Indian OCD: talking without thinking, expressing opinion because it’s a constitutionally granted freedom.

“What three wheeler do you want her to drive to college ?” I asked the OCD bro.

“No. I just asked out of curiosity “ he replied more guiltlessly than your favourite politician.

How many irrelevant questions should a doctor reply to patiently?
Running between emergencies, making crucial life and death decisions for others over 30-40 times a day, with zero allowance for mistakes and facing angry, troubled souls who we genuinely want to help, how much extra time and patience for irrelevant questions is a doctor expected to waste? If relevant and crisp, every doctor enjoys the conversation, effective communication. When that enters the realm of “charche pe charcha”, it frustrates the doctor. Imagine that happening about twenty times a day. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Can a doctor refuse to answer irrelevant questions? Yes, but that risks a bad online review, rating in spite of correct diagnosis and good outcomes!

The consultation charges that a regular doctor charges are meant for a thorough history taking, examination and deduction of possible diagnosis, advice about tests required, and the best possible options of treatment/ management. It also includes a to-the-point explanation and information to the patient and attendant. It doesn’t include the unending “questioning” and expectations that the patient/ relative should grasp everything immediately- medicine is indeed very complicated. We usually give patients the websites to read from, but it cannot be the doctor’s responsibility to make the patient understand everything- it’s like asking the Judges to explain their decisions and law to both parties involved in each case- every day.

Every medical student should learn how to patiently, courteously tell the patient and relatives to limit the conversation to relevant questions only. It is an art. One can also schedule a separate paid consultation in case the family had extended questions and needs the doctor’s extra time.

Just when I was finishing a late day, a patient who had just left returned, panting because he was running.

“Doc, I forgot to ask you- is it okay to smoke a few cigarettes? – I am quite stressed you know”.

I smiled and replied “No you can’t. Reduce stress rather than killing yourself slowly with both smoking and stress”.

That was a relevant question though, as it reminded me of reducing stress in my own life. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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