Category Archives: orphan

“Do you want a broken leg, Doctor?”

“Do you want a broken leg, Doctor?”
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Three days after he suffered a paralysis, after having tried Voo Doo, Herbal and some other medicines, an old man of 80 was shifted to a big private hospital once he became comatose. The three sons accompanying him didn’t even touch the comatose patient, they didn’t even care about whether he was covered properly or not.
His Blood Pressure was too high, and he turned out to have a bleeding in the brain, untreated till this moment. His brain was swollen badly.

Every private hospital has free mandatory beds for poor patients. This family was asked about their preference and eligibility. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
“We will pay everything. Don’t worry about the money. He should get the best room and facilities” his son said. They signed the necessary documents about knowing the critical condition of the patient, charging schedules, willingness to pay etc.
Then the sons came to me and said “We don’t care about the money, doctor, but he should get completely cured”.
This was expected, experience teaches a doctor about relatives as much as about patients.
“He is 80 years old and critical. At this stage I cannot guarantee anything. Complete recovery looks impossible, partial recovery may be hoped for if he responds well to standard treatment” I replied.
“But we will pay anything you want” the younger son said.
I involved the PRO, a lady who had far better patience than myself dealing with attitude and arrogance. Explained them once again, and left after the patient was shifted to our Neuro Intensive Care Unit. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The patient improved in five days. Started to speak a few relevant words. Out of danger, shifted to Deluxe Room as requested. The only person who ever attended the patient was a 15 year old grandson, mostly the patient was left alone.
The sons had by then submitted some documents claiming a BPL “Below Poverty Line” status, but those were found to be false. A fake letter in the name of charity commissioner was also attempted. The hospital PRO reminded the patient’s sons about the pending bills regularly.

It became clear that none of the three sons who earned well themselves wanted to pay for their father’s treatment. They had continuous fights amongst themselves, the only thing they agreed upon was not wanting their father. The request “He must get completely cured” was not because they wanted his health, but because no one wanted to take home a disabled father to care for years.

The hospital took a stern stand. The bills had exceeded two lacs rupees, nothing was paid. This indeed was burglary with blackmail.

After repeatedly asking to meet the patient’s sons for another three days who did not pick up the hospital calls, I told the attending boy very carefully to please remind his parents to settle the pending bills, also reminding him that nothing in the treatment will wait or change because of bills.

In two hours I received a call. It was a local Municipal Councilor.
“Doctor, do you want a broken leg? Are you a doctor or a businessman? How can you speak about money to a small boy? Just keep on treating. We will do something about the bills through our MLA. If you speak about bills again, remember, there will be news about your hospital on every channel”.

Do I have time, energy to waste, filing a police complaint? Will it be any use at all? © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

In no other industry, not even in govt. offices, will anyone be given anything on credit: even for a paper worth five rupees. Even the poorest of the poor cannot get free food or travel in private industry. But the entire private medical care is expected to go on working in ‘credit’ mode, for everyone who claims to be poor. Emergency is understood, and no hospital or doctor thinks about money in case of emergency. But once emergency is over, those who cannot afford a private hospital should go to a government hospital. A private hospital needs too much investment per bed, and anyone who questions this can please sponsor one bed in any ICU for a poor patient, see for themselves what the actuals cost.

Who will even address this Burglary and Blackmail that happens everyday in every private hospital in India?

There should be an online portal by government / police for doctors and hospitals to report patients dumped by family, families who refuse to pay, those who use threats and intimidation anonymously. Then the ‘other side’ of this story will be clear.

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The Sweetest Pinnacle Of Life

The Sweetest Pinnacle Of Life© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

To many students who are lost in their search for the right aims and goals in life, who trusted me enough to ask that question, I have suggested that they imagine what they actually want in their life at its Pinnacle.

Success, riches, fame, awards and accolades, a legacy, achievements are all good to show and leave behind oneself. The truth is far more than that. Love and care, affection and respect in one’s evening of life is what everyone deserves, but few are fortunate to achieve. For what good is s life that spends its aged years in desolation, isolation, despair of an uncaring, loveless family one has sacrificed much to bring up well?

Hollow words of “show- love” and “pretend care” are commonly employed everywhere, especially among the rich, educated and culture-claiming pundits of humanity.

One experience I have is worth sharing: that the poorest of the poor, like the farmer in the wheelchair here, are cared for with far more genuine love and affection than many. This family collected alms and help to get him to India, and never asked for any concessions, free treatment etc., always saying they were willing to do anything for the happiness and health of this grandpa. His son standing by his side is an illiterate farmer, but is caring for his father . quoting proudly “He brought me up!”. There is no smell of “I am obliging my parent” in his behaviour.

I have met hundreds of Arabic Muslim patients who care for their parents, sons and daughters equally well, willing and with total faith in the treating doctor. It does not change with their financial status. They insist on the parents staying with them, ask questions about their food, exercise, medicines, happiness and comply strictly with the given instructions.

They naturally do not know the words “Culture, Rights, Medicolegal, Elderly care, Nursing Homes, Mercy Killing etc.”. Rarely have I seen them unemotionally “okay” with a bad diagnosis of a parent.

This old man, in my personal opinion, is one of the luckiest human beings upon earth!

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Thank you, Mr. Naser Ali, Mr. Abdul Hakim Mohd. Al Malahi, Mr. Majdi Jamil Aiselwi, Mr. Ahmed Anwar Aqlan!

A Policeman’s Tears

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“She was found unconscious and naked lying on the road. The baby was near her, moving when we found her, now she also looks unconscious” said the police constable. “Actually I had my civil dress in my jeep, I covered both with my clothes and got them here. Most likely an orphan roadside beggar”.

It was early morning, I had gone to the casualty for a call as a medicine resident, and was chatting with the CMO when this police constable had rushed in the mother and the baby, probably less than a year old. He and his colleague completed the formalities and left. The CMO was alone, so I stayed on to assist.

The lady had high grade fever and some bruises all over her body, only one on the thigh deep enough that it bled. She also had a contusion upon the head. Needless to say, unclean and unkempt, visibly quite weak and poorly fed body. There was a traditional tattoo on her forearm that said “Seeta” in distorted devnagari script. The baby was dehydrated and had fever too, with only minor contusions.

“Sending her to female ward, and the baby to paediatric” said the CMO. We completed the police information and Medicolegal form, the nurses had started the IV line for the lady. I accompanied the baby to the pediatric ward, handed her over to the resident doctor friend on duty and went to the female ward to attend the other admissions. Basic medicines for fever and head injury were started for Seeta. There was no CT scan facility in the hospital. Blood tests were sent.

In absence of relatives, it’s the interns, resident doctors and nurses who attend to the necessities of such patients. Administration mocks everyone sympathetic and compassionate to such patients, be it a government, private or corporate set up. My professor advised some more blood tests. Some tests were not available in the govt. hospital, we had to send them outside. As we had just received the stipend, money was not a big problem.

Next evening I went to the pediatric ward to find out what was happening with the baby.
“She has had convulsions”, the resident colleague told me. We have loaded her with anticonvulsants, but she still has fever. Dr. Jain madam (new lecturer in paediatrics) has advised lumbar puncture, but there’s the consent problem”.
I went to talk to the lecturer, she was all insulting. “Don’t teach me what to do. We will send a request to the dean, and if he allows, then the resident will do the lumbar puncture” she said, “By the way, what’s your interest in this baby? Why don’t you mind your own business? I have heard about you.. you are in the student’s union na? Don’t throw your weight around me.” She said.

The dean consented to our request, and a lumbar puncture was done. The baby had probable tuberculous meningoencephalitis (infection of the brain and its coverings). Antituberculous medicines were started.

The comments of the pediatric lecturer made me extremely angry. Most of her resident doctors hated her attitude too. Those remarks soon spread and various sick, exaggerated and vulgar jokes about me caring for that orphan baby made rounds among my colleagues. But one good thing about wanting to do good is the shameless pride and courage that comes ingrained with it.

My colleague Dr. Madhu stood by me. She often reminded me: “There are five percent good people in the world, and 95 percent bad, Einstein has said, but it is the five percent good who take the world forward, they represent human race”. That has always pumped me up against all the mockery that I ever faced for being “too sensitive and compassionate to be sane”.

The best support for the poor and helpless always comes from the poor and helpless. The pompous, actionless “blah blah” of advising others to be more kind and compassionate is usually the trademark of those who themselves rarely help anyone. The mamas and mausis (wardboys and helpers) of the ward came together to attend Seeta during their duty.

The pediatric resident told us on the third day that the baby’s health had gone bad, and she was unlikely to survive. Dr. Madhu stopped smiling. “At least can we shift the baby near her mom?” we discussed. It was of course not possible.

Dr. Oak (real name), one of our ophthalmology genius professors, learnt about this. He came over and told us in his royal tones, to tap him anytime for any help. He also left some money with us.

On the fourth day, the lady started having convulsions too. We ran around, trying to arrange whatever the professor suggested. She was gradually sinking. Tuberculosis neglected and untreated is one of the most cruel diseases. It takes over ten days for the action of Tb medicines to kick in.

On the fifth day, the baby passed away in the morning, and the lady shortly after. That coincidence was less tragic than their trolleys being rolled into the mortuary together.

“What happens now?” we asked the mortuary in charge.
“They will be cremated as orphan, unclaimed bodies after the post mortem” he told.

In a world of billions, ruled by religious, powerful and rich, a young mother and a baby girl would be cremated as orphans! We told the mortuary assistant to please keep us posted, and came out. Of course we could not sleep.

Next day we took special permission and went to attend their cremation.
On the way, we bought some flowers, a tiny dress for the girl and a saree for her mom, probably the first new clothes ever for either of them. Dr. Madhu had already brought a few bangles, a necklace and two bindis with her.

Dr. Madhu was sobbing as we returned. The rowdy looking policeman with us also wiped his eyes. He dropped us back to the medical college in his jeep.

He said in a heavy voice as we parted:
“Doctor, we see all the worst things in the society. We meet criminals day and night. But when such young girls and babies die, I feel like shooting everyone who didn’t come out to help them. People just talk, nobody helps. God bless you. You have what it takes to be a doctor. Don’t ever change.”

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Years later, I read about a divine human being from Chennai, one Mr. S Sreedhar, who collects unclaimed dead bodies from various hospitals, and performs decent and respectful last rites for them. Planning to meet and touch his feet one day.
Please share unedited.