Tag Archives: doctor patient relationship

The Colour Of Blessings

The Colour Of Blessings

© Dr Rajas Deshpande

Carefully calculating the dose and mixing it with the intravenous fluid with precision, I told the kind old lady: “I am starting the medicine drip now. If you feel anything unpleasant, please tell me.”

Through her pain, she smiled in reply. Her son, my lecturer Dr. SK, stood beside us and reassured her too. He had to leave for the OPD, there already was a rush today. “Please take care of her and call me if you feel anything is wrong” he said and left.

Dr. SK’s mom was advised chemotherapy of a cancer. It was quite difficult to calculate its doses and prepare the right concentration for the intravenous drip. Just a month ago, my guide Dr. Pradeep (PY) Muley had taught me how to accurately prepare and administer it, so when Dr. SK’s mom was admitted, he requested me to do it for her too.

The drip started. After a few hours, I noticed that her urine bag needed emptying. The ‘mausi’ supposed to do it was already out for some work. Any resident doctor in India naturally replaces whoever is absent. So I wore gloves, requested a bucket from the nurse, and emptied the urobag into it. Just as I carried the bucket with urine towards the ward bathrooms, Dr. SK returned, and offered to carry it himself, but I told him it was okay and went on to keep the bucket near the bathroom where the ‘mausi’ would later clean it. © Dr Rajas Deshpande

Once the drip was over, Dr. SK invited me for a tea at a small stall outside the campus. He appeared disturbed. He said awkwardly: “Listen, please don’t misunderstand, but when I saw you carrying my mother’s urine in the bucket, I was amazed. You are a Brahmin, right? When you were away, my mom even scolded me why I allowed you to do it, she felt it was embarrassing, as we hail from the Bahujan community. I am myself a leader of our association, as you already know”.

I knew it, to be honest. His was a feared name in most circles.He was a kindly but aggressive leader of their community, but always ready to help anyone from any caste or religion, to stand by anyone oppressed, especially from the poor and discriminated backgrounds.

“I didn’t think of it Sir! She is a patient, besides that she’s your mother, and I am your student, it is my duty to do whatever is necessary. Otherwise too, my parents have always insisted that I never entertain any such differences”. I replied. © Dr Rajas Deshpande

“That’s okay, but I admit my prejudice about you has changed,” he said. “If you ever face any trouble, consider me your elder brother and let me know if I can do anything for you”. What an honest, courageous admission! Unless every Indian who thinks he / she is superior or different than any other Indian actually faces the hateful racist in the West who ill-treats them both as “browns or blacks”, they will never understand the pain of discrimination!

As fate would have it, in a few months, I had an argument with a professor about some posting. The professor then called me and said “So long as I am an examiner, don’t expect to pass your MD exams.”

I was quite worried. My parents were waiting for me to finish PG and finally start life near them, I already had a few months old son, and our financial status wasn’t robust. I could not afford to waste six months. © Dr Rajas Deshpande

I went to Dr. SK. He asked all details. Then he came with me to the threatening professor. He first asked me to apologise to the professor for having argued, which I did. Then he told the professor: “Rajas is my younger brother. Please don’t threaten him ever. Pass him if he deserves, fail him if he performs poor. But don’t fail him if he performs well. I will ask other examiners”.

The professor then told me that he had threatened me “in a fit of rage”, and it was all over.

With the grace of God, good teachers and hard work, I did pass my MD in first attempt. When I went to touch his feet, Dr. SK took me to his mom, who showered her loving blessings upon me once again, and gifted me a Hundred rupee note from her secret pouch. © Dr Rajas Deshpande

Like most other students, I’ve had friends from all social folds at all times in school and colleges. I had excellent relations with the leaders of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Association, and twice in my life they have jumped in to help me in my fight against injustice when everyone else had refused. I love the most fierce weapon of all that Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar himself carried: the fountain pen!

No amount of fights will ever resolve any problems between any two communities, the only way forward is to respectfully walk together and find solutions. Fortunately, no doctor, even in India, thinks about any patient in the terms of their religion or caste. (© Dr Rajas Deshpande). Just like the Judge in the court premises, humanity is the single supreme authority in any medical premises. Blood or heart, brain or breathing are not exclusive to any religion or community. Just like the bigger brain, a bigger heart is also the sign of evolution.

I so much wish that the black clouds of disharmony between different communities are forever gone. The only hope is that our students can open any doors and break any walls, so long as they do not grow up into egoistic stiffs. © Dr Rajas Deshpande

I am proud to belong to the medical cult of those who never entertain any discrimination. A patient’s blessing has no coloured flags attached! Even outside my profession, I deeply believe that the very God I pray exists in every single human being I meet. If at all anyone asks me, I am happy to say that:

My religion, my caste and my duty as a doctor are all one: Humanity first!

© Dr Rajas Deshpande

Neurologist

Pune

Please Share Unedited

The Morphine That Killed a Hospital

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“He fell down while checking the patient”, said the panicked Dr. Mrs. Sane about her husband, “and became unconscious”.

Dr. Sane tried to maintain his calm. A sick doctor has the curse of knowing the worst of everything, and has a perpetual feeling of sitting upon a ticking time-bomb. It was a sad feeling to see this middle aged brilliant general practitioner fighting tears.

“Sir, the OPD numbers have shot up because of these epidemics, especially dengue. I see over a hundred patients every day. The Inpatient beds are full. There are daily problems: medical, administrative and medico-legal.. those I am used to. But now there are too many politico-social and press-related issues that worry me”.

Dr. Deshmukh, a senior practitioner and a common friend, accompanied Dr. Sane. He cautiously poked him “You must tell the doctor what happened the day before”.
“Oh that’s a part of our profession” Dr. Sane replied.
I insisted that he must tell me.

Reluctantly, he disclosed: “Some goons came in with a municipal councillor and threatened to waive off the bills of a dengue patient. He was in the ICU for five days, quite bad, but went home walking. Till the time he improved, they kept on threatening us to break the hospital and thrash us if something went wrong. Upon discharge, they didn’t pay a single rupee. There’s nowhere to complain, as the hospital requires many municipal permissions”. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Dr. Mrs Sane lost her cool. She started sobbing. “No one blames those who dump garbage, keep their surroundings unclean. No one is blamed when epidemics spread and thousands die. No one is held responsible for failures of almost all preventive services and lack of basic facilities at government’s healthcare institutes. But the already overworked general practitioners must bear the brunt of everyone’s anger: the public and press are always free to bash the last face they see: the doctor who is actually helping every patient,.. Dr. Sane has not had a proper lunch, not spent a full day with kids in months.. That hospital has become our curse“ She broke down.

It was so logical! The offices responsible cannot even be reached. The court does not see any of these system failures that cause millions of deaths all across India, happily ordering lakhs and crores and imprisonments for doctors, for trivial mistakes.
Whom to blame? Oh yes, the doctor who has studied to treat the sick!

Anyway, in a country fond of muscular heroes and billionaire godmen, who expects a brainy analysis? © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“I had a dream of making best health facilities available for my area. I have taken a big loan. We treat poor patients free anyway. Many rich are sent by local politicians, leaders, administrators with instructions to attend immediately and free too. Paying patients are mostly suspicious because of all the negative things publicised by press about all doctors., they also expect immediate and positive outcomes. I have not slept for many a nights. “

I examined him.He had obvious features of being fatigued mentally and physically.. A syncopal attack, where the BP drops down suddenly and makes the patient unconscious, was likely. I advised him tests and told him to take rest for there days.

“Not possible, sir! Even now the OPD is waiting” he replied. An angry Dr. Mrs Sane requested me to intervene.

“Your duty to the society does not free you from the duty towards your own health and family” I requested him. But Dr. Sane agreed only when Dr. Deshmukh offered to send over a junior doctor to his hospital to take care of the OPD.

“How have you been, Sir?” I asked Dr. Deshmukh. He is one of the most respected and busiest general practitioners in town, with a big hospital. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Dr. Deshmukh smiled.
“I had an angioplasty three months ago. The only risk factor was high BP and stress. There is no use fighting or explaining our situation to the society, government or press. I have closed down my hospital. I only see OPD patients now. Anyway many patients thought that I worked day and night for earning more money. Let them go to the corporate or government hospitals.”

The death of his hospital was not a surprising news, many small private hospitals and nursing homes are either closing down or converting into profit-making franchises. Many doctors are suffering high BP, cardiac and neurological problems and even dying due to excessive stress.

The meaning of this nightmare will soon unfold upon our society.
Till then, this is a heartfelt appeal to all the over-stressed doctors to rethink about their priorities, rearrange life and make sure stress does not kill.

For the morphine of “medical social service” is only good in small doses, it kills when overdone!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Essentials Of Being A Smart Doctor

“Essentials Of Being A Smart Doctor”FB_IMG_1470417314264
Guest Lecture at National Undergraduate Students Conference ‘RESPIRARE’ at the
BJ Medical College
August 3 in B. J. Medical College
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

My dear friends,
If you are sitting in this hall today, you have already proven that you are smarter human beings, but that alone is not enough for becoming a smart doctor. However intelligent or smart anyone else may be in the outside world, your ability to save their life, help them in illness gives you an upper hand, hence the perpetual tag “Doctor sahab” bestowed upon you by the world. To be able to gracefully deserve that tag is a difficult task.
Like success, riches and many other achievements in the world, medical smartness too is not an accident. One has to earn it with a great effort.
There are really smart and good doctors, and there are also those who pretend so. Most patients can tell the difference. So if you plan to be a really smart doctor, you will have to imbibe the essential qualities in your very subconscious, so they become your basic self, a part of your personality. You will have to force yourself to change certain habits, traits of your behaviour and thinking, and allow the inception of newer, better methods within your being. I am very happy that I can speak this to you at this budding stage, while you still have ample time to modify the DNAs of your medical smartness. Once you accept to change for better, never go back or compromise. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Let us consider a small question: What quality is universally liked in a human being by almost everyone, including their enemy?
Genius?
Looks? Money?
Muscle power? Political Connections?
No.
Compassion. Kindness.
It is irresistible. Even when a patient has come to you with a prejudice or suspicion, the first thing that will change his / her attitude is your kind words, your compassionate attitude. It is not very easy to be kind and compassionate to everyone, especially the ill-behaved. This is where you will need to train yourself to be smart: by avoiding use of bad words, not raising your voice and not being aggressive. Keep your words to a minimum, and do not use negative, accusing words. Do not speak arrogantly with the relatives. You don’t know when things may take a bad turn.
However, the first few steps that you take to be kind to the patient will get you the biggest reward that this field has to offer: your patient’s trust, and if you care for it, it is usually lifelong. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
When the patients come in, they are not willingly entering the hospital in most cases, but out of desperation. They are scared, angry and often extremely worried that something bad will turn up as their diagnosis. Add to this the resentment caused by having to be questioned and touched by a total stranger, whom they have to tell private information. This has already made them jittery.
A smart doctor understands this mental state of the patient completely, and makes the best effort to ease out the patient by welcoming them, wishing them, and initiating a genuinely friendly chat. Such simple sentences like “Good Morning, How are you?”, “Hope you are not very tired”, “I am sorry that you had to wait” reassure the patient that they are dealing with a nice human being, and put them at ease.
Whether the patient comes from rich or poor, educated or illiterate background, the doctor must have utmost respect for their privacy and dignity. Asking private questions, undressing and examination should never embarrass the patient. Standing up and wishing the patient while they enter and leave your room makes the patient feel respected, and adds flair to your smartness. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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How should a doctor dress?
It is common to see few doctors, both junior and senior, wearing short sleeves and open collars, sometimes even low rise jeans, trying to show off their physique. One can only imagine what kind of reaction they will generate if things go wrong.
There have been many scientific studies about this. If you yourself want to be treated, you will never prefer a shabby looking, ungroomed, unclean person with a stink. You will want someone who looks healthy and positive to make health choices for you. The patient always wants to see a neat, clean and reassuring doctor. Your demeanour should not be frivolous: unnecessary excessive laughing, smiling, joking, bad language are not welcome to be used in front of a worried patient. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

It is wise to dress up as good as one can, without too much show and fashion. A very richly dressed doctor in a suit may turn off an already nervous patient from lower socioeconomic classes. The best attire is formal, simple, clean and ironed clothes which cover you well, apron, shoes, and no jewellery. Fortunately, tattoos and piercings have not yet much entered this field. One must avoid religious clues, and refrain from religious and political talk while practicing as an allopath.
A smart doctor cannot forget that our field deals with people from different socio-economic strata. He / she should be able to irradiate the feeling of being a trustworthy person and invoke positive, peaceful feelings in those who come to see him / her.
Personal hygiene is an indicator of a doctor’s smartness, and such simple things as hand-washing after every case, using sanitizers, wearing gloves etc. speak a lot about a doctor’s dedication towards good health. Best clinical practices must be learnt and complied with voluntarily by everyone who wants to be a smart doctor. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Humility, manners and etiquette
A Spanish TV anchor who follows up with me for Multiple Sclerosis told me once: that many patients travelling to India complain about the doctors being very good clinically, but worst in manners. “I was amazed that you actually offered me a glass of water when I was crying during my first consult” she said. Such simple manners affect the patients so much!
Many doctors, as they ascend the merit scales in this profession, develop a complex that they are unbeatably smart. They end up becoming ego-balls disliked by almost everyone, because of their high handedness. A smart doctor will never let that happen to himself / herself. There are far more smarter people than most doctors in almost every other field, even some illiterates are sometimes smarter than the most literate. One must never shed humility, whatever one’s achievements. We often see students smarter than teachers, juniors smarter than seniors and we all know what happens in those cases. The best policy is to never presume oneself better than the other. A smart doctor always knows his manners and etiquettes very well. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Language and communication:
“What do you mean by dizziness?” my teacher asked a tired female patient once.
“Oh I feel abnormal noise in my ears” she replied. Dizziness, in patient’s language, may mean anything from imbalance, blackout, vertigo, to heavy-headedness or blurring of vision. It is always wise to dig into what they actually mean. A knowledge of regional language often helps resolve misunderstandings. Similarly, the patient may also misunderstand the words that a doctor uses.
A smart doctor will learn to communicate so as to make the patients from different streams understand exactly what is being conveyed. We do not always have too much time, hence it is necessary to develop the skill of using minimum words. One must use simple words, and know the colloquial alternatives (e.g. use “Heart” instead of “Cardiac”, use “Brain infection” instead of “Encephalitis” etc.). If the patient does not understand, one must encourage him / her to ask questions. Use pictures if necessary. Many patients / relatives do not stick to time or subject, often asking irrelevant questions based upon their googling, but a smart doctor must be able to steer them on to the right path with a smile and a gentle reminder of time limitation.
The most difficult part of being a doctor is conveying the bad news. There is no good way, one has to be very careful and diligent. On one hand one must offer sympathy and readiness to help further, while on the other hand, one must also be aware of aggressive, impulsive and shocked reactions, making sure not to risk one’s safety.
While conveying the bad news, surgical risk or complications, a doctor must have the patient / relatives sit down, have witnesses around, and speak compassionately but confidently, offering all possible help to ease out their suffering. A hesitant doctor invokes suspicion even if correct. However, an overconfident liar will invite more trouble, so be careful that you speak what is the exact truth. That never fails in long run. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Professional Smartness
Friends, as you become more and more specialised, you will unfortunately face rivalry and jealousy. Doctors are the most ingenious professionals in their ability of pulling legs or sabotaging careers, and you may sometimes be facing your own teachers in such situations. A smart doctor will never compromise his / her own grace or the dignity of our noble profession. Fight all that you must, and I will stand by you if you are correct, but always use the best language, think about and mention the best things about your competitor, and always keep the door for direct discussion open. Refrain from allegations, cheap comments, mockery and defamation. If you feel that a colleague is wrong in some clinical decision, please reach out to them and talk, before you discuss it with others. Everyone usually has a reason for their decisions, one must respect it. If your reaching out is unwelcome, then alone mention on paper what you think about the case. A smart professional will have no friends or enemies, no senior or juniors, but only colleagues. Immediate reporting of any adverse clinical events to the authorities, and correct documentation are essential. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Medico legal Smartness
We live in a country with too much poverty and illiteracy. If there is a chance that a doctor’s mistake can be proven, there is every chance that the relatives will drag that doctor into the courts of law, demanding millions in compensation.
In these days of exponential medico legal cases, where patients, relatives, authorities and even some colleagues are usually unforgiving if you commit a mistake, real smartness is to document everything perfectly. Just as an example, a young patient of mine recently had a stroke, without any known risk factor. Upon repeated questioning, he reported that he was taking some unknown herbal medicine since three months, in a mixture of some oils, to improve memory. One must mention every such detail on the paper, including poor known history, delayed admission and alternative treatments. Every interaction with the patient and relatives must be recorded on paper. Recording the date, time and your name and designation at the beginning of every note is an indication of you basic smartness. A proper written consent must be obtained for every procedure, however trivial. Information about dangerous medicine being given to the patient / relative should be recorded, a consent for the same signed by the relatives. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Academic Smartness
I do not know if I am enough qualified to talk about this, because I was often beaten up by my primary school teachers for not doing my home work and some other curiosities which I cannot mention here.
A doctor is expected to be on top of the pyramid of scientific advances, and there is nothing more pathetic than a doctor who quotes medical knowledge from decades ago. While we respect the past, we cannot disrespect what every standard medical textbook mentions on its first page: Medicine is an ever-changing science. A smart doctor, therefore, will still study on a daily basis even after achieving the highest degrees, and keep himself / herself updated with the most recent medical knowledge relevant to his / her field. Studying on a daily basis, I feel, is the most important basic quality every smart doctor must inculcate. One must register on smart medical sites like up-to-date, emedicine or many others, to stay updated about one’s medical interests. Yours is a lucky generation, having all information at your fingertips, thanks to your smartphones. Check drug interactions every time you use new medicines. Cross check your differential diagnoses. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Digital Smartness
Everyone is semi-addicted to their smartphones. However, they are also a great hindrance to the super-essential concentration required of a smart doctor while interacting with patients or making medical decisions. Smartphones can be wisely used to record data and expedite certain protocols, accessing information etc., but they should be switched off while with a patient. It is very humiliating and irritating for a patient when the doctor is occupied with a cellphone during a consult.
Social Smartness
There is a competition now among some doctors to post everything they do on the social media. A colleague of mine recently posted a video of a huge tumor that she removed from the abdomen of a patient. She is now under an enquiry for compromising patient privacy. One must refrain from posting any information that discloses patient’s identity on the social media.
Most of you google your crush, actor or actress you like, don’t you? Well, some of you will honestly agree.
Patients are as curious and inquisitive as you are, and may google you. So please refrain from posting undignified pictures / matter / vulgar jokes, etc. and pictures while drinking / smoking, hugging etc. on social media. Also refrain from posting stuff that maligns your own profession or colleagues. You can improve things from within, not by publicising them.
A smart doctor will learn over time to refrain from giving out personal number to the patients / relatives, as this may lead to many disadvantages later, including unwanted calls, messages, advertisements and other misuse.
While patronising should be avoided completely, (“You are my brother, sister, mother, father etc.), in some cases it may reassure a frightened patient, hence it may only rarely be used. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
It is not at all uncommon for a doctor or a patient to get a crush upon the other. In case you sense a love interest blossoming within your patient or yourself, immediately rethink about your life’s choices and refrain from any further progress in that direction, as this could turn disastrous for your career. Do not encourage meaningless chats, messaging or personal comments when dealing with patients. An allegation of molestation, sexual harassment or mal-intention can ruin you.
Most doctors feel proud of their excess hard work, and often mention that they work without proper food or sleep for days together. While this is really commendable, it is also a granted feature of this career. One must learn not to milk a pardon for one’s ill behaviour or mistakes by quoting excess work. A mistake is a mistake and the best policy about a medical mistake is being completely honest about it. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Moral Smartness
My recently published book, “The Doctor Gene” ends with the words “A good doctor is the best a human being can be”.
You belong to a community that practices the highest of morals not just because the society expects it, but because you have voluntarily sworn to. You have chosen this career yourself. Right from now, please imbibe the best of morals and truthful attitudes in your blood. Believe me, every human being has the hidden sense to perceive a genuinely good person, make sure that your patients get this feeling about you. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Serenity Smartness
One important art in medicine is almost on the verge of extinction: that of immense concentration. What with the hustle-bustle and digital exposure that every medico must work with, we are fast losing the ability to switch off the world and concentrate, think or meditate. These things bring the serenity, so essential an ingredient of medical smartness. Learn to find time, preferably on a daily basis, to be with yourself, and sort out the tangles in your mind before they strangulate you.
Higher education
I get atleast one question everyday from some or other medical student on my facebook page:
Which branch is best? What PG should I do?
You will eventually realise what you like. You may seek opinions, but not decisions from others. Be smart enough to identify what you want and respect your own inclinations. Keep a list of alternative options, as PG seats are limited. Don’t waste too much time in pursuing a particular branch, there are so many advances happening that every PG branch offers you good futures if you are dedicated enough. There are umpteen examples on the other side: doctors who got their desired specialties but never did anything significant after that, other than customary routine. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
De-stressing
I am sure that in this very hall, there are beautiful dancers, painters, far better authors than myself, speakers, and artists of infinite ability. I think I should also say some potential models. But you will give up all that art and beauty within yourself, lost in the heavy duty career of being a doctor.
One absolute essential for every medico is a sure-shot de-stressing mechanism. We are all destined to face suffering, poverty, struggle, pain and death on a daily basis, and this takes a toll upon our minds. We tend to grow mentally old very soon. Many think that alcohol or smoking is a respite, but this is ridiculously stupid. A smart doctor knows to find his / her escape in arts, literature, family, travel and other hobbies. It is extremely essential to de-stress as your performance may be affected if you accumulate stress for long. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
What do patients want?
The best compliment for a doctor is a happy patient, and the best feeling in the world is knowing that your efforts saved a life.
A smart doctor is the one who has the reputation of making the correct diagnosis in majority of cases. A smart doctor is the one who invokes trust in a patient by being genuinely honest and compassionate. A smart doctor is the one, most of whose patients are happy, not only because their health issues are well attended, but also because they met a caring, well behaved human being.
Never think about money or anything else when consulting a patient. Think of every case as an exam case, get the most correct history, do the best clinical examination and give the patient the best treatment options. You will make enough happy money with such practice, if you are smart enough to understand what that means. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Dear friends, one thing about smartness which I learnt early in my medical career is that a senior doctor should not give very long lectures, and should end up his speech before time.
I have written many more things about the essentials of being a truly good doctor, and the glorious traditions of our noble, almost divine profession, in my book “The Doctor Gene’. If you did not get a copy outside, please email thedoctorgene@gmail.com to get your copy.
I am sure that you will all be very successful doctors, and I will be very happy if my words today help you deal with your medical life smartly. I thank you for patiently listening to me today.

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Love to you all and I wish you all the best, always!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
03.08.2016
Thank you, Mr. Yashodhan Morye and BJMC UG Student’s Council

Have Doctors become Mechanical?

(c) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Sir, most of your stories you share are from your internship days. I have worked as an intern for past 10 months but almost never encountered/experienced such heart touching events and I don’t think, i am any less humane or sensitive than you must be(guessing by your posts). then why almost every intern is so mechanical about his schedule and work? Has the nature of work/ job profile of interns changed to mere mamagiri? Or Its just that, you always went the extra mile to be the awesome being you are! Awaiting your reply eagerly.. Dr. AA

Dear Dr AA, yes doctors have become more and more mechanical, also preoccupied with too many non-clinical tasks like USMLE / MRCP / pg entrance studies, digital addictions and excess non-duty work. Talking to the patients and making them open up is an extremely difficult art. Just like we don’t open up to any roadside stranger, patients do no talk much to a disinterested doctor in a hurry.

There is no one without problems, no one who does not need more love and kindness, but people will not respond if they sense “artificial” empathy. Most illiterates and even infants sense true versus artificial love. So every doctor must learn to imagine himself/ herself in the patients’ condition, and genuinely solve their problem the best they can. There also is a growing tendency to think oneself “superior” to patient or other professionals. No one talks comfortably with the “high handed”. Indeed there are many patients/ relatives more intelligent than the treating doctor, the respect for a doctor is only for his/her medical prowess and kindness.

The first hint of “trying to show off more than what you know” switches off the patient. This tendency is also increasing among some doctors, who transgress their specialty and adversely talk about other specialists or professions. Even the illiterate patients understand (may not express) your overall nature in a few minutes. One must be very polite, humble and genuinely interested and helpful to every patient to be able to connect. In many cases half the agony is the fear of the medical situation. Every doctor does not have time, but those who spend more time per patient hit it well with the patient.

Hope that answers your question. Also, I have always kept a diary. I spent my internship in quite rural and backward areas, the faith in a doctor was still young, and I loved to talk to the “patient”, so time was not an issue. Like most young doctors, I was (and am) never fond of sleep. I had another advantage: I have been a loner.

I know you are (in fact everyone is) gifted by God / Nature a golden heart with a divine song. It is up to us how to use it. The practice of Good Medicine is almost as difficult as a spiritual life: many sacrifices are required. But one should not expect the patient to “Pay Up” or bear the brunt of our sacrifices. It is a choice we have made.

Take care and use the one chance of touching every heart you meet wisely, with immense passion, forgiveness and love. The returns will not be material, but I am sure you don’t care for material gains because you asked this question.

There is no “Extra Mile” for a good doctor. Whatever Good can be done, must be done.

God bless!

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Reply to a question asked by Dr. Arvind Arora, Intern, India.

The Grandiose Genius

The KHAMIR poison.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“Doctor, we think that doctor treating my mom is giving her the wrong treatment. She is in the ICU, unconscious, for last three days” said the angry and crying son.
A 55 year old nice farmer lady with epilepsy, well controlled with two medicines, without fits for last three years had suddenly developed many fits / convulsions at home, and was now in ICU, ventilated because of the necessity to paralyse the patient to control fits (a common recommended treatment). Her brain had suffered damage due to lack of oxygen as breathing was compromised during fits.

As per their request I called to talk to the doctor treating her. She courteously explained that the patient was admitted after many convulsions, in an unconscious state, with dangerously low oxygen levels. The management since admission that she narrated appeared the correct one recommended in this case. “We will try to wean the patient off venti tomorrow” she said.

10 days later, the patient visited my OPD with her sons. Having known me earlier, the emotional lady held my hands and cried a while, thanking God for her rebirth.

“What happened on that day?” I asked her.

“Oh I had missed my antiepileptic (fits) medicine for five days.” She said.
“Why?” I asked agitated, as we clearly explain to every patient the importance of taking medicine regularly, in time, and stocking extra too.

“I live in a village. My son sends me this medicine from Pune. This time I told him a month earlier, but he couldn’t send it as he was busy”. Said the ever forgiving Mom.

I looked at the son. He said, semi guilty, “Doctor, I thought four five days of break in treatment would not make a difference. Also some people tell us that sometimes doctors prescribe unnecessary medicines for years, so we were confused whether she should continue. She had not had a convulsion for three years too”.

“Then why did you blame that ICU doctor?” I asked, still sizzling inside with hurtful anger.

“You can understand, Sir, we were emotionally disturbed as Mom was critical. Also, we had to spend a lot for her treatment”.
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A case of brain cancer, stage 4. Headache neglected for years. MRI was delayed for months after the doctor advised it for headache. Then done at a free center by long awaited appointment. Multiple secondaries had caused block to the flow of brain water (CSF). Operated by one of the best reputed neurosurgeon, only to restore the lifesaving flow of CSF and obtain biopsy. It proved stage 4 cancer. Patient by now medically unfit for radiotherapy. The relative kept on asking: “Was the neurosurgeon wrong? Was the surgery done correctly?”.

Where do we bring faith and trust from, in this world where even brothers, sisters, parents are killed for money and most couples find it difficult to respectfully trust each other?

The more kindness the doctor shows, the more he/ she is taken advantage of. People look at every chance of not paying or paying less, and if paying at all, expecting a miracle with that payment. From someone they don’t trust.

In the widening valley between patient and the doctor, where trust is paramount, shows like Satyamev Jayate and some other media have further created a rift that has caused severe damage. This “KHAMIR” poison has really caused immense corrosive effect on this beautiful profession of intellectuals. Like other cheap “filmy” philosophies, conclusions by revengeful murders, the whole allegation game neglects the very high standards of education, compassion and sacrifice practiced by 90% Doctors in India and elsewhere.

Of course a logical analysis is not to be expected from someone not well educated. Many celebrities have been victims of the “genius grandiose” that money and fame brings.

The effect of this “Khamir poison”:

Many if not most patients now enter the hospitals with suspicion in their mind, and aversion for the entire process of consultation, paying fees, investigating, admission and taking treatment, all of which is a natural healthy process followed worldwide in all hospitals. Indian patients are unaware of how good the available specialist medical services are, at least in the urban/ semiurban areas, at the lowest costs anywhere in the world. Just because there are a few unfair practices (btw, most of which originated out of the policylessness and “charity for all” expectations from healthcare industry) and few greedy doctors, so many others suffer, doctors and patients too!

It takes 2 years to get an appointment of Joint replacement Surgeon, One year for a Neurologist, One year for a cardiologist, Three months to do an MRI, in most of the developed world. These can be expedited only in emergency, where one cannot have the choice of a specialist. This is mainly because they work 8-5 OPDs. Even senior docs in India work late nights and earn one tenth or less in most cases, to be available for anyone within a day irrespective of their financial / social status.

The notion that everything best in medical care should also be low priced or free is damaging the future of this profession. Add to this the loose talk by middle-school educated celebrities who have great hold on the illiterates / semi-literates, people who are angry at the govt., at their own poverty, unemployment etc., and find the “Intellectual, hardworking and doing comparatively better” class of harmless doctors an easy target to screw for their personal frustrations.

The “Khamir” poison is not a surprise, for it definitely stems from a desperate attempt to use one’s celeb status to cover for the lack of any serious academic achievements and intellect by attacking those who have these. What surprises is the willingness with which both the illiterates and literates swallow it, not knowing how harmful it is for themselves.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande