Tag Archives: medical education

The Changing Blood Group

The Changing Blood Group

(c) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“He is sinking” shouted Dr. Siya.

The casualty registrar rushed to the bed, checked the vitals. Pulse very fast. Blood Pressure very low. Lips and nails white, hands and feet cold. The young man, unconscious, was on the verge of death.

“He must be bleeding inside. Get an urgent sonography of his abdomen”said the registrar to Dr. Siya, and call the blood bank. He will need at least two units of blood urgently”.

It was Dr. Siya’s first week into internship, she was thrilled with the idea of actually saving lives. At the young age of 22, she was witnessing death almost every other day. Along with that she was amazed to see the darkest sides of human nature: the potential of humans to hurt each other: via rapes, accidents, murders, fights. She had decided to not let this affect her attitude, and to continue to try and save every life she could.

That late night, this young man of about her own age was brought in unconscious by someone, who had just dropped the patient in the casualty and left without leaving any identity of himself. “I found him lying unconscious on the road. I don’t know anything else about him. I am just doing my duty, I have a train to catch”said the stranger and left. The patient was reeking of alcohol. He had a visible head injury. A quick CT scan had revealed minimal bleeding due to a small skull fracture. He also had had bleeding from wounds from his hands and legs, they were sutured. The patient had no identity marks, wallet or cellphone. The policy of the hospital was to provide basic treatment and shift the patient to the government hospital. The police station was already informed. Treatment was started.

Dr. Siya requested two units of blood. The blood bank called. They had only one unit of the blood for his blood group. The registrar had the same blood group, and like many doctors working in the emergency departments, he went down to donate blood.

It was nearly midnight. The fate of the life of a young man depended upon what the junior doctor did just then. There was no one to sign any consents, the protocol was to inform the hospital’s medical director and obtain consent for emergency transfusion or procedure. Dr. Siya finished the formalities, obtained the permission, and started the transfusion. If the patient had reacted or something went wrong now, they all feared, there will be a havoc in the media: that they had let an unknown patient die because they wanted money!

Dr. Siya kept on managing the show. The angry and disturbed relatives of other critical patients kept on taunting her, speaking rude and reluctant to complete simple formalities and paperwork.

The sonography was thankfully normal.

Just as the first unit of blood was over, the patient became conscious, and revealed his name. He was quite shaken with the surrounding, but told in broken sentences about his friend’s number and address. He revealed that while returning from a party, his bike was interrupted by a bunch of goons, he had fallen down, they hit him upon the head and left with all this belongings.

The friend was called, and came in. He revealed that the patient was used to smoking weed and drinking alcohol in huge quantities. They were staying in the hostel of a famous college.

The second blood unit was started, and in a short while the patient threw a convulsion. He was immediately given injectables for controlling the convulsions, he slept off with the effect.

His parents arrived early next morning.. The shocked mother was consoled and explained about the situation by Dr. Siya. The elderly father, like all fathers, equally shocked but being a father unable to cry, kept mum, just holding hands of the boy.

When the patient woke up again, the father came to Dr. Siya, and touched her feet. Too embarrased, she told him that the registrar had donated blood for the patient. The father went and thanked the registrar, again trying to touch his feet.

As Dr. Siya had finished her night duty, she prepared to leave. “Beta, Will you come soon please?”asked the tearful mother to her. “Yes Auntie, I will be back soon. Don’t worry, he is ok now”she reassured and left.

On her way back her genius young mind tried to look at the situation sitting upon her shoulder, the little third person that resides within each one who has a conscience. That booze and weed was easily available to youngsters in almost all Indian hostels, that even educated people rode bikes without helmet, that crimes were happening almost everywhere that injured and killed people, that law and order was a laughable term in many parts ofthe country, that there was no government mechanism in place to provide emergency medical / paramedic support ambulances to raod / traffic accident victims: which one is the most responsible cause, when patients like these died? Who is responsible?

She reached home, told her proud parents what had happened, that she had helped save a life. Her mother folded her hands towards the sky, said “God, let my daughter save many lives everday”.

While having the breakfast, her father turned on the TV. A famous but ill educated political leader, in his mind-and-other- organs blowing speech in Karnataka, was explaining the illiterate public how all Indian doctors charged in excess, how they were only after money, how everyone except himself was the enemy of the millions of patients surviving from critical heart attacks, accidents, strokes and other diseases. All patients getting better all over te country was only thanks to himself and his government!

Dr. Siya’s father laughed bitterly. “Next time you need blood for any poor or unknown patient, call him” he said.

Dr. Siya replied, laughing “That kind of ëver changing blood group doesn’t match anyone, it is useless for any patient, Papa”.

(c) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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Ban the Entire Medical Profession!

Ban the Entire Medical Profession!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

We were always much entertained by a very famous surgeon who would just sit all dressed up in the operation theater. As the worried relatives kept praying in the waiting room, the patient was operated by some other experienced and skilled doctors employed by this ‘famous’ doctor. He would just sit watching TV in his private room within the operation theater, till the surgery was over. Then, he would come out with a benevolent smile, pretend that he was too exhausted, and tell the relatives “that was an extraordinary case. We had almost lost your patient. I had to make a great effort, use all my dedication, knowledge and experience, but finally I could save him. You are very lucky”. Needless to say, the relatives would touch his feet, overwhelmed by emotion, little knowing that this surgeon has not even touched their patient. Bills floated swollen. The patient or the relatives never knew who actually saved that life. In our education to be doctors, we also learnt “what not to do” from such doctors!

With a recent speech in London, I was reminded of this.
It was very unfortunate that the Hon’ble Prime Minister of our own country spoke quite demeaning about the entire Indian medical profession in a foreign country. Nearly one third doctors in the developed world are from India, leaving India because it offers them no good opportunity, compensation or even basic security. The PM seems to disown the patriotic doctors who try to survive in and serve India. Where is the love for India? Does one demonstrate it by showing everyone else in the country down?© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Let me at the outset clarify that there are some corrupt doctors, some get favours from pharma, and some participate in malpractice. The government always had rights and law in their hand to act against such doctors. The hubs of corruption evolve when the government allows medical seats to be bought for the meritless rich. Our govt. allows crores of sales of medical seats.

We wish our PM also spoke about how many political leaders in this country own medical colleges and what is the actual income that they generate by sales of UG / PG medical seats? Like the prices of all drugs and stents, why not reduce the price of medical seats too?

He said that Indian doctors “do not travel to Singapore to see poor patients”. Was he serving the poor Indian farmers in London? How many poor farmers or labourers accompanied the PM or his delegations on any of his foreign trips? For a PM who has extensively travelled the world, to criticise highly educated doctors for traveling abroad is so unbecoming! Doctors interact with experts from other countries for learning, continuing medical education, and just because Indian politics has screwed the nation into poverty, doctors cannot stop that interaction which is a standard learning process all the world over. Just as Indian politicians who go abroad for treatment to Singapore and London etc. don’t go there to have fun, doctors too do not go for just fun but for a grand purpose: to bring in new knowledge and skills to Indian people.

Then he said that he “enquired” about stents and found that doctors were “”duping” / deceiving all patients into buying costly stents. The PM has himself said in many speeches that he is not educated much, any medical discussion needs high standards of education, scientific proofs and statistics. I am sure that the right people / departments / doctors were consulted by the PM before taking such decisions. Why did he then say “I found out and changed this” rather than “our medical experts / team did this” ? Under the privacy laws no one will know what stents go into which class of people, but from what the doctors see, most politicians and high placed officers opt for “the best and imported”. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

We wish that the PM, on his next foreign trip on an international platform, also speaks about the state of the government-run hospitals, the federal funding for healthcare, the quality of healthcare provided at rural and primary healthcare centers all across India, the gross inadequacy of staff and the absence of specialists, ICUs, Operation Theatres, in almost all government-run hospitals.

We also wish the PM speaks on an international platform about the state of hostels for undergraduate and postgraduate medical students in India, where they have to live about 4-6 people in a small single room, while the huge luxurious premises for various govt. officers and ministers lie vacant most of the time.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

We wish the PM also speaks about the good doctors (all his recent speeches imply that there are no good doctors in India), extraordinary medical achievements of Indian doctors, about those who serve in rural India while facing humungous difficulties, those who bring medical tourism to India, those who run so many charity hospitals, those who bring world class healthcare to Indian patients, those grassroot doctors and paramedics who effectively carry out the govt’s schemes all year round by hard work, including polio and other vaccinations, mother-child care etc. without “just once posing” for the media?\

Even under various govt. health schemes, the poorer class patients go to cheaper general wards, while a senior officer from the same office will receive premium class healthcare at a private hospital. This “class-discrimination” in healthcare by govt is not justified. Wish the PM spoke about this too.

Will the PM also speak about the doctors/ health department officials and ministers who help him bring good changes in Indian Healthcare? If the entire modern medicine profession was so bad, why doesn’t the PM ban it completely and provide healthcare with different Babas and Gurus so rampant with powerful blessings today?

We so much wish that the PM speaks on an international platform how he justifies brutal violence against doctors all over India.

India deserves far better healthcare. But that starts with the facilities for majority: at the level of government-run hospitals, healthcare facilities all over India, reachable for the common man, affordable equally to all classes. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Unless all the government hospitals provide high quality free healthcare to all without discrimination, unless all the problems that the govt can resolve in a day by sanctioning adequate staff and funds for government-run healthcare are sorted out, it is futile to just increase the gap between the doctor and patient by blanket-defamation and maligning of the private healthcare on public platforms, especially international. Incidentally, our private hospitals also cater to millions of poor and the very ministers who run the country.

I have nothing personal against any political leader or party, I am hopeful of good changes happening in Indian healthcare. But I feel compelled to speak about the other side, the good doctors who are the pride of our country. I must defend the good in my profession, because I love it just as I love my patients, just as I love my India.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The Cult of Good Blood: Superhero Medical Students

The Cult of Good Blood:
Superhero Medical Students
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

He grew up selling vegetables and fruits grown by his mother. He went door to door and in the village market to sell those. He also walked for two miles every day to catch a bus to a school over 20 miles away. He then enrolled in a private class that waived off his fees, because he had a passion: He desperately wanted to become a doctor.

Atul Dhakne, son of a school teacher Mr. Nivruttirao Dhakne and farmer Mrs. Mandabai Dhakne, with his hard work and merit, got admission in the prestigious B.J. Medical College in Pune.

But he wasn’t satisfied. “What about those like me who are from the poor rural background, those who have no access to good classes and education, but want to become doctors?” he worried.

Good Blood speaks, whichever soul it flows in. Young medical students of different origins, studying with him, decided to resolve this. Ketan, son of a lawyer Mr. Avinash Deshmukh (who mostly handles cases for the non-affording,) wanted to do charity like his father. Farooque Faras, whose father raised a family in one small room, was burning with the desire to give. Many others joined in (names below), and the Cult of Good Blood multiplied. They all wanted to uplift the deserving.

“Lift For Upliftment” was born, formed by the superheroes among medical students.

They printed posters and went to almost all junior colleges in Pune, appealing students from poor backgrounds to join their free tuitions / classes, to prepare for the CET /NEET. In the first round, over 40 students joined. After the medical college hours, Atul and his friends took turns to teach these poor students, give them notes, set question papers, conduct exams, assess and counsel for improvement. All expenses were borne from their own puny pocket-money.

There was no fixed place for the class. One local bakery owner, Mr. Dinesh Konde, decided to help these students. He planned the logistics and took them to the corporator Mr. Avinash Shinde, who asked for only one thing in return of his help: commitment to continue this good work. The Cult agreed whole-heartedly. With him, they approached Mrs. Meenakshi Raut, Asst. Director in the education department in Pune, who helped them get two classrooms in a Municipal school after the school hours. The classes thus became regular, every day, from 6-9 PM.

The cult lacked stationery, the huge backup of notes and question paper sets for 40 students, so they approached Mr. Sanjeevkumar Sonavne from Latur, who runs many educational institutes, helps poor students, and even pays the fees of some who cannot afford college. Mr. Shelke and Dr. Harish from Sassoon Hospitals also joined hands to help.

The results were impressive: from the first such batch, 6 students qualified for MBBS, 3 for BDS, 11 for BAMS and 2 for BHMS.

No one had earned anything, but Good Blood flowed forward. Many medical students from subsequent batches came forward to teach free, imparting their fresh acquired knowledge and skills to those who could otherwise have no access to it.

There is no discrimination while accepting junior college students for their class. They have two batches now with 60 students in each. They have also started weekend classes for poor students preparing for NEET in the extremely backward area of Maharashtra, named Melghat. These medical students go to Melghat with their own expenses, teach the rural junior college students over the weekend, and return to attend the tough schedules of medical college again!

“I learned helping others from my mother. We don’t earn anything, but we learn something precious every day” tells Atul, who has now passed MBBS. Ketan Deshmukh, Abhiraj Matre and Farooque Faras help him supervise the group. Their endless enthusiasm only reminded me of how much more I can do. I came to know of this group “LFU” during the recent “Quest Medical Academy” event arranged by Dr. Sushant Shinde.

They are naturally, perpetually short of funds.
I am not rich, but I won’t feel right about myself if I didn’t contribute. They graciously accepted.

When these students came to meet me today, I offered them dinner at a good restaurant (knowing that they stay in hostels). Farooque said “Sir, we will rather use that money to print some more question paper sets”. Farooque’s father has stopped all celebrations in the family, and sends all the money he can, from his one small room home, for the torch of humanity that his son carries forward!

When they asked for an advice, I had but one small request for them: that a Doctor should be completely free of all political and religious influence at work, in teaching, and especially while treating a patient. They assured me that “Lift For Upliftment” has decided to never be affiliated to a political or religious organization, keeping humanity as their highest ideal.

There is no better lamp than the one which carries the light from soul to soul. There is no better definition of humanity than holding hands of those who need it most. I feel very happy today, that I could contribute to this beautiful, divine cause.

Long Live the Cult Of Good Blood, and may we all find it in abundance within ourselves!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The group “LFU” also includes: Esha Agarwal, Shivkumar Thorat, Satyender, Tanvi Modi, Mayank Tripathi, Nikhil Nagpal, Sitanshu, Arvind Kumar, Nagesh Pimpre, all from the B. J. Medical College Pune.

PS: My heartfelt appeal to all medical students and doctors to contribute by starting similar activity in your region, by teaching poor students who want to become doctors, by joining this group and / or by donating for this cause.

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Advise Doctors What To Do?

 

For the hypocrites who don’t do anything to correct their own profession (almost every profession has immense corruption), but think they have the right to criticise other professions. Criticising the most intellectual profession of doctors irrespective of one’s own credibility, effort, contribution, or even intellect, has become an ugly fashion.
Here’s the answer:
(C) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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Doctor’s Fees: A Taboo Topic

Doctor’s Fees: A Taboo Topic
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
A famous industrialist from Pune recently visited my OPD. My Boss called me on phone and told me to waive off the fees, as he was a close friend of my Boss. The industrialist was not only well behaved, but well-read too. He had a complicated problem, had seen Neurologists etc. in India and UK. He asked many questions, and I was happy to have been able to reply to most. The consultation lasted over 45 minutes. He went out, and was told by the receptionist that his fees was waived off. He knocked my door, came back in, and placed three thousand rupees on my table. My usual fees is half that.
“Doc, I don’t believe in taking advantage. You gave me all the time I needed, and I have paid far more to the foreign doctors for a fraction of that time” he said.
 
Just a few days prior, a European patient from Mumbai had visited with her Indian in-laws, and after a detailed consultation, when they went out and paid the usual fees of 1500 INR, she messaged me: that this was far lower for the service they received. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
Two days ago, on Saturday night at 9 PM, one lady rushed in without appointment, an engineer now working in Pune. Quite lavish in her get up and paraphernalia, she told me she had recently delivered a baby in the USA and then returned to India. After we finished the consultation that lasted over 30 minutes, and included many questions and explanations about her “minor” neurological problem, about justification of diagnosis, every medicine, about lactation, and about her prior medical consultations, I was happy that I had answered all her questions, and was able to treat her without any tests. Then she said: “And yes, doc, your fees is too high. Most doctors in my area charge less than that. I want concession”.
 
Earlier it was quite embarrassing for me to discuss money with patients. I felt it was below my dignity to have to talk about money, and humiliating to have to explain my fees. When I decided what I charged, it was after a prolonged thought process, and awareness of Indian healthcare scenario and socioeconomic conditions. While being available for genuinely poor patients, I did not want to resort to any backdoor incomes, and also wanted to give every patient the best of my skill acquired over 15 years of education, and enough time. There are clean doctors, far more senior than me, in my branch, who know this well and charge a lot more as consultation fees than I do (some over 5000 INR for a single consult), for they know their own worth. But there also are few who for their own reasons continue to charge far lesser, some with a noble intention (usually at the fag end of their career), some with alternative plans. It is a personal preference of the doctor, especially specialist. A correct diagnosis and honest /right advise is becoming rare and rare, what with the quality of medical education and an admixture of streams, which aim at the fast, cheap, objective and basic rather than specialized, subjective and accurate. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
In absence of any comparable example, (medical service is not comparable to any other, but to quote an example that most should understand), I have to mention this: when one buys land, home, good food or technology, one pays differently at different places, for different brands. No one argues about the rates of foreign cellphones or jewelry, even about cinema tickets, but the most important service of all: health, is considered a bargainable, perpetually low cost charity. Basic and emergency healthcare doesn’t mean attached super-technology, five star rooms and washrooms and air conditioning, best qualified staff and ancillary services. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
Used to this question very frequently, I told this lady that my fees was the same as that of most super-specialists in larger cities, that it was based upon qualification, experience, skill and time spent. She wouldn’t listen, and refused to pay. I told her she could avail of the free OPD meant for poor patients if she had a BPL card or if she was a farmer. “I can afford, I am not poor. But I want concession, because some doctors in my area charge only XXX”she said. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
A senior doctor had advised me during the beginning of my practice: “Concentrate on the affordability of the middle class. Manage your time with the patient according to their affordability, people are rarely willing to pay the doctor. If your consultation fees is high, you will turn off many patients, because even the rich opt for the cheapest possible healthcare, including the doctor”. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
Of course I did not want to discriminate. But over a period of time I realized that most of the forced free categories keep on repeatedly visiting various specialists / hospitals (a free category patient visits over three consultants for every medical issue) because it is free/ low cost, this is a frustrating scenario. Even the affording class visits many specialists for the same problem because the doctor’s fees is too ‘affordable’.
 
A doctor must always be kind and compassionate, but in India, he / she also needs to be practical to avoid being exploited. Compare to the availability of a free food service at your home for the poor. Check out for yourself how many misuse it, and how often. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
Various pathies and specialties have a different fees structure, and people must be educated that all doctors cannot charge the same. A surgeon or physician with more skill, experience, expertise and good outcomes is definitely entitled to charge more than his peers. After all, what is a few thousand rupees when one’s health is concerned? When filing suits against doctors who commit mistakes, people claim in crores, a fact that must be accounted for when the doctor charges his / her fees.
 
“Your fees has increased” said a patient, who has paid the same fees for last 8 years. When I asked him to name any commodity whose price hasn’t increased in last eight years, he said “But you are a doctor”. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
Among all the inflations happening everywhere, it is only the doctor’s fees that mostly remains unchanged for years. There are excellent charity institutes with great healthcare services , also many government hospitals, but most people want a “Premium / Priority” healthcare service at their lowest rates, refusing to stand in a queue at such hospitals. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
The cut throat competition among hospitals to match society’s low cost healthcare expectations has resulted in a nightmare: most of the permanent staff being hired is low-salary, low qualification overworked, and exploited, many of the consumables used are of a questionable quality. This reflects worst in most critical care units and some surgical units. Very few will understand the true depth of this horrible tragedy.
 
While all cut-practice and other malpractices must end, while every doctor must compassionately aim at resolving the health problem that the patient trusts him / her with, and satisfy the patient as much as possible, it is also necessary that people understand that good healthcare will come at a higher cost. No doctor should refuse emergency /basic treatment to a patient who really cannot afford. Other than this, “Cheaper Doctors are the kindest and the best” is a devastating superstition we must eradicate.
 
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
 
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The King Of Merit

The King Of Merit
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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“My work and my merit is my answer to all my fears” Yashwant Gade replied.

During first year in MBBS I once had a fight with a classmate. We belonged to two different communities, and the student body politics in medical colleges was not very evolved then. Someone tried to blow up the matter into a caste issue.

That is when I first met Yashwant Gade. He was in final MBBS, and I had seen him often engrossed in his books in the library. Curly hair, thin built, and the proud, fearless attitude of a lion. He was involved in most student activities. He listened to me patiently and immediately called my rival from the hostel, resolved our ego problems and averted what could have become an unwanted, ugly memory.

“Both of you are only medical students in this campus. A medical student cannot afford to lose even a single minute. I don’t want to hear about any fights hereafter from either of you” he warned us.
His warm nature and smiling face encouraged us to become his friends. He had the knack of saying things in a straightforward yet wise way. “Aren’t you scared of speaking your mind?” I asked him once.

“My work and my merit is my answer to all my fears” he replied.

Then we gradually realised that we were in the company of an exceptional hero.

He could not afford travelling to the school by bus, so he had walked to and from his school over five kilometres away. He stood first in the Maharashtra state in the 10th standard board exams.

He did not have money to pay the fees for junior college. The management of Shahu college invited him to join them, waiving off his fees. He did them proud when he topped the 12th standard exams in the state.

He topped all three MBBS exams in the Marathwada University. Then he won the open merit post graduate (MS) seat in Orthopaedics. The postgraduates were underpaid and over-utilised then too, but Dr. Yashwant’s younger brother had become an architect by then. He supported by paying for Dr. Yashwant’s fees.

Dr. Yashwant then naturally topped the MS Orthopaedics exam! More importantly, he appeared for the MPSC with non-medical subjects and topped the state in that exam too, in the same year as he topped the MS!

Although a topper throughout his career, the saddest aspect of merit: that it is useless unless one has money enough to sell it, hit him hard. He had no money to start a surgical set up so essential for his practice. Financial insecurity he could not afford then. He decided to do what was needed: enough stability to support the family.

He joined as a deputy collector.
He was posted in dangerous areas away from civil world, and often walked long distances just to eat his meals. He had decided to give it his best, dreaming of setting examples in administration.
It was not to be. The political interference in his work that tied his hands was too much for his self-respect to tolerate. He resigned and returned after two years, and decided to kickstart a new career.

He started working with a friend Dr. Bipin Miniyar.
In a few years, Dr. Yashwant Gade created his own identity in the Orthopedic world, simultaneously working at a government hospital as a teacher, earning his rank as Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Ortho-Oncology in the Government Cancer Hospital at Aurangabad.

In a society running after glamorous stars and scions of rich business houses, where clothes and cars and watches and houses now make a man, the greatness of a lion who fought all odds and tore through all exams to emerge first in every single one of them will appeal only to those who understand the meaning of the word “Merit”. The ability to defeat fate year after year till it has hailed you with the crown of a winner is not given to everyone.

Had he chosen to work in the developed world, I am sure he’d have a private jet by now!

Some egos stink of merit, some of their position, and most with money stink the worst. But even after winning all these three “Oscars” of life, Dr. Yashwant is as simple and down to earth as he was when I met him as a medical student.

Like respect and love, Merit cannot be bought. I am proud to know this ‘King’ of hard work and merit. He is still deep rooted in his background: maintaining a farm and encouraging the rich cultural traditions of an Indian Farmer.

Dr. Yashwant Gade, you are an outstanding role model for any medical student anywhere in the world. You are also the type of icon India desperately needs!

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Happiness Is

Happiness Is:
A thirteen years old sweet fighter coming over to gift something she made with such affection for her doctor 😀 Thank you, Kanika Kesri.
Delighted & obliged with your gesture🙏🏻.15403864_727777090704871_7134881359160639060_o

Essentials Of Being A Smart Doctor

“Essentials Of Being A Smart Doctor”FB_IMG_1470417314264
Guest Lecture at National Undergraduate Students Conference ‘RESPIRARE’ at the
BJ Medical College
August 3 in B. J. Medical College
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

My dear friends,
If you are sitting in this hall today, you have already proven that you are smarter human beings, but that alone is not enough for becoming a smart doctor. However intelligent or smart anyone else may be in the outside world, your ability to save their life, help them in illness gives you an upper hand, hence the perpetual tag “Doctor sahab” bestowed upon you by the world. To be able to gracefully deserve that tag is a difficult task.
Like success, riches and many other achievements in the world, medical smartness too is not an accident. One has to earn it with a great effort.
There are really smart and good doctors, and there are also those who pretend so. Most patients can tell the difference. So if you plan to be a really smart doctor, you will have to imbibe the essential qualities in your very subconscious, so they become your basic self, a part of your personality. You will have to force yourself to change certain habits, traits of your behaviour and thinking, and allow the inception of newer, better methods within your being. I am very happy that I can speak this to you at this budding stage, while you still have ample time to modify the DNAs of your medical smartness. Once you accept to change for better, never go back or compromise. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Let us consider a small question: What quality is universally liked in a human being by almost everyone, including their enemy?
Genius?
Looks? Money?
Muscle power? Political Connections?
No.
Compassion. Kindness.
It is irresistible. Even when a patient has come to you with a prejudice or suspicion, the first thing that will change his / her attitude is your kind words, your compassionate attitude. It is not very easy to be kind and compassionate to everyone, especially the ill-behaved. This is where you will need to train yourself to be smart: by avoiding use of bad words, not raising your voice and not being aggressive. Keep your words to a minimum, and do not use negative, accusing words. Do not speak arrogantly with the relatives. You don’t know when things may take a bad turn.
However, the first few steps that you take to be kind to the patient will get you the biggest reward that this field has to offer: your patient’s trust, and if you care for it, it is usually lifelong. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
When the patients come in, they are not willingly entering the hospital in most cases, but out of desperation. They are scared, angry and often extremely worried that something bad will turn up as their diagnosis. Add to this the resentment caused by having to be questioned and touched by a total stranger, whom they have to tell private information. This has already made them jittery.
A smart doctor understands this mental state of the patient completely, and makes the best effort to ease out the patient by welcoming them, wishing them, and initiating a genuinely friendly chat. Such simple sentences like “Good Morning, How are you?”, “Hope you are not very tired”, “I am sorry that you had to wait” reassure the patient that they are dealing with a nice human being, and put them at ease.
Whether the patient comes from rich or poor, educated or illiterate background, the doctor must have utmost respect for their privacy and dignity. Asking private questions, undressing and examination should never embarrass the patient. Standing up and wishing the patient while they enter and leave your room makes the patient feel respected, and adds flair to your smartness. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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How should a doctor dress?
It is common to see few doctors, both junior and senior, wearing short sleeves and open collars, sometimes even low rise jeans, trying to show off their physique. One can only imagine what kind of reaction they will generate if things go wrong.
There have been many scientific studies about this. If you yourself want to be treated, you will never prefer a shabby looking, ungroomed, unclean person with a stink. You will want someone who looks healthy and positive to make health choices for you. The patient always wants to see a neat, clean and reassuring doctor. Your demeanour should not be frivolous: unnecessary excessive laughing, smiling, joking, bad language are not welcome to be used in front of a worried patient. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

It is wise to dress up as good as one can, without too much show and fashion. A very richly dressed doctor in a suit may turn off an already nervous patient from lower socioeconomic classes. The best attire is formal, simple, clean and ironed clothes which cover you well, apron, shoes, and no jewellery. Fortunately, tattoos and piercings have not yet much entered this field. One must avoid religious clues, and refrain from religious and political talk while practicing as an allopath.
A smart doctor cannot forget that our field deals with people from different socio-economic strata. He / she should be able to irradiate the feeling of being a trustworthy person and invoke positive, peaceful feelings in those who come to see him / her.
Personal hygiene is an indicator of a doctor’s smartness, and such simple things as hand-washing after every case, using sanitizers, wearing gloves etc. speak a lot about a doctor’s dedication towards good health. Best clinical practices must be learnt and complied with voluntarily by everyone who wants to be a smart doctor. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Humility, manners and etiquette
A Spanish TV anchor who follows up with me for Multiple Sclerosis told me once: that many patients travelling to India complain about the doctors being very good clinically, but worst in manners. “I was amazed that you actually offered me a glass of water when I was crying during my first consult” she said. Such simple manners affect the patients so much!
Many doctors, as they ascend the merit scales in this profession, develop a complex that they are unbeatably smart. They end up becoming ego-balls disliked by almost everyone, because of their high handedness. A smart doctor will never let that happen to himself / herself. There are far more smarter people than most doctors in almost every other field, even some illiterates are sometimes smarter than the most literate. One must never shed humility, whatever one’s achievements. We often see students smarter than teachers, juniors smarter than seniors and we all know what happens in those cases. The best policy is to never presume oneself better than the other. A smart doctor always knows his manners and etiquettes very well. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Language and communication:
“What do you mean by dizziness?” my teacher asked a tired female patient once.
“Oh I feel abnormal noise in my ears” she replied. Dizziness, in patient’s language, may mean anything from imbalance, blackout, vertigo, to heavy-headedness or blurring of vision. It is always wise to dig into what they actually mean. A knowledge of regional language often helps resolve misunderstandings. Similarly, the patient may also misunderstand the words that a doctor uses.
A smart doctor will learn to communicate so as to make the patients from different streams understand exactly what is being conveyed. We do not always have too much time, hence it is necessary to develop the skill of using minimum words. One must use simple words, and know the colloquial alternatives (e.g. use “Heart” instead of “Cardiac”, use “Brain infection” instead of “Encephalitis” etc.). If the patient does not understand, one must encourage him / her to ask questions. Use pictures if necessary. Many patients / relatives do not stick to time or subject, often asking irrelevant questions based upon their googling, but a smart doctor must be able to steer them on to the right path with a smile and a gentle reminder of time limitation.
The most difficult part of being a doctor is conveying the bad news. There is no good way, one has to be very careful and diligent. On one hand one must offer sympathy and readiness to help further, while on the other hand, one must also be aware of aggressive, impulsive and shocked reactions, making sure not to risk one’s safety.
While conveying the bad news, surgical risk or complications, a doctor must have the patient / relatives sit down, have witnesses around, and speak compassionately but confidently, offering all possible help to ease out their suffering. A hesitant doctor invokes suspicion even if correct. However, an overconfident liar will invite more trouble, so be careful that you speak what is the exact truth. That never fails in long run. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Professional Smartness
Friends, as you become more and more specialised, you will unfortunately face rivalry and jealousy. Doctors are the most ingenious professionals in their ability of pulling legs or sabotaging careers, and you may sometimes be facing your own teachers in such situations. A smart doctor will never compromise his / her own grace or the dignity of our noble profession. Fight all that you must, and I will stand by you if you are correct, but always use the best language, think about and mention the best things about your competitor, and always keep the door for direct discussion open. Refrain from allegations, cheap comments, mockery and defamation. If you feel that a colleague is wrong in some clinical decision, please reach out to them and talk, before you discuss it with others. Everyone usually has a reason for their decisions, one must respect it. If your reaching out is unwelcome, then alone mention on paper what you think about the case. A smart professional will have no friends or enemies, no senior or juniors, but only colleagues. Immediate reporting of any adverse clinical events to the authorities, and correct documentation are essential. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Medico legal Smartness
We live in a country with too much poverty and illiteracy. If there is a chance that a doctor’s mistake can be proven, there is every chance that the relatives will drag that doctor into the courts of law, demanding millions in compensation.
In these days of exponential medico legal cases, where patients, relatives, authorities and even some colleagues are usually unforgiving if you commit a mistake, real smartness is to document everything perfectly. Just as an example, a young patient of mine recently had a stroke, without any known risk factor. Upon repeated questioning, he reported that he was taking some unknown herbal medicine since three months, in a mixture of some oils, to improve memory. One must mention every such detail on the paper, including poor known history, delayed admission and alternative treatments. Every interaction with the patient and relatives must be recorded on paper. Recording the date, time and your name and designation at the beginning of every note is an indication of you basic smartness. A proper written consent must be obtained for every procedure, however trivial. Information about dangerous medicine being given to the patient / relative should be recorded, a consent for the same signed by the relatives. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Academic Smartness
I do not know if I am enough qualified to talk about this, because I was often beaten up by my primary school teachers for not doing my home work and some other curiosities which I cannot mention here.
A doctor is expected to be on top of the pyramid of scientific advances, and there is nothing more pathetic than a doctor who quotes medical knowledge from decades ago. While we respect the past, we cannot disrespect what every standard medical textbook mentions on its first page: Medicine is an ever-changing science. A smart doctor, therefore, will still study on a daily basis even after achieving the highest degrees, and keep himself / herself updated with the most recent medical knowledge relevant to his / her field. Studying on a daily basis, I feel, is the most important basic quality every smart doctor must inculcate. One must register on smart medical sites like up-to-date, emedicine or many others, to stay updated about one’s medical interests. Yours is a lucky generation, having all information at your fingertips, thanks to your smartphones. Check drug interactions every time you use new medicines. Cross check your differential diagnoses. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Digital Smartness
Everyone is semi-addicted to their smartphones. However, they are also a great hindrance to the super-essential concentration required of a smart doctor while interacting with patients or making medical decisions. Smartphones can be wisely used to record data and expedite certain protocols, accessing information etc., but they should be switched off while with a patient. It is very humiliating and irritating for a patient when the doctor is occupied with a cellphone during a consult.
Social Smartness
There is a competition now among some doctors to post everything they do on the social media. A colleague of mine recently posted a video of a huge tumor that she removed from the abdomen of a patient. She is now under an enquiry for compromising patient privacy. One must refrain from posting any information that discloses patient’s identity on the social media.
Most of you google your crush, actor or actress you like, don’t you? Well, some of you will honestly agree.
Patients are as curious and inquisitive as you are, and may google you. So please refrain from posting undignified pictures / matter / vulgar jokes, etc. and pictures while drinking / smoking, hugging etc. on social media. Also refrain from posting stuff that maligns your own profession or colleagues. You can improve things from within, not by publicising them.
A smart doctor will learn over time to refrain from giving out personal number to the patients / relatives, as this may lead to many disadvantages later, including unwanted calls, messages, advertisements and other misuse.
While patronising should be avoided completely, (“You are my brother, sister, mother, father etc.), in some cases it may reassure a frightened patient, hence it may only rarely be used. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
It is not at all uncommon for a doctor or a patient to get a crush upon the other. In case you sense a love interest blossoming within your patient or yourself, immediately rethink about your life’s choices and refrain from any further progress in that direction, as this could turn disastrous for your career. Do not encourage meaningless chats, messaging or personal comments when dealing with patients. An allegation of molestation, sexual harassment or mal-intention can ruin you.
Most doctors feel proud of their excess hard work, and often mention that they work without proper food or sleep for days together. While this is really commendable, it is also a granted feature of this career. One must learn not to milk a pardon for one’s ill behaviour or mistakes by quoting excess work. A mistake is a mistake and the best policy about a medical mistake is being completely honest about it. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Moral Smartness
My recently published book, “The Doctor Gene” ends with the words “A good doctor is the best a human being can be”.
You belong to a community that practices the highest of morals not just because the society expects it, but because you have voluntarily sworn to. You have chosen this career yourself. Right from now, please imbibe the best of morals and truthful attitudes in your blood. Believe me, every human being has the hidden sense to perceive a genuinely good person, make sure that your patients get this feeling about you. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Serenity Smartness
One important art in medicine is almost on the verge of extinction: that of immense concentration. What with the hustle-bustle and digital exposure that every medico must work with, we are fast losing the ability to switch off the world and concentrate, think or meditate. These things bring the serenity, so essential an ingredient of medical smartness. Learn to find time, preferably on a daily basis, to be with yourself, and sort out the tangles in your mind before they strangulate you.
Higher education
I get atleast one question everyday from some or other medical student on my facebook page:
Which branch is best? What PG should I do?
You will eventually realise what you like. You may seek opinions, but not decisions from others. Be smart enough to identify what you want and respect your own inclinations. Keep a list of alternative options, as PG seats are limited. Don’t waste too much time in pursuing a particular branch, there are so many advances happening that every PG branch offers you good futures if you are dedicated enough. There are umpteen examples on the other side: doctors who got their desired specialties but never did anything significant after that, other than customary routine. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
De-stressing
I am sure that in this very hall, there are beautiful dancers, painters, far better authors than myself, speakers, and artists of infinite ability. I think I should also say some potential models. But you will give up all that art and beauty within yourself, lost in the heavy duty career of being a doctor.
One absolute essential for every medico is a sure-shot de-stressing mechanism. We are all destined to face suffering, poverty, struggle, pain and death on a daily basis, and this takes a toll upon our minds. We tend to grow mentally old very soon. Many think that alcohol or smoking is a respite, but this is ridiculously stupid. A smart doctor knows to find his / her escape in arts, literature, family, travel and other hobbies. It is extremely essential to de-stress as your performance may be affected if you accumulate stress for long. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
What do patients want?
The best compliment for a doctor is a happy patient, and the best feeling in the world is knowing that your efforts saved a life.
A smart doctor is the one who has the reputation of making the correct diagnosis in majority of cases. A smart doctor is the one who invokes trust in a patient by being genuinely honest and compassionate. A smart doctor is the one, most of whose patients are happy, not only because their health issues are well attended, but also because they met a caring, well behaved human being.
Never think about money or anything else when consulting a patient. Think of every case as an exam case, get the most correct history, do the best clinical examination and give the patient the best treatment options. You will make enough happy money with such practice, if you are smart enough to understand what that means. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande
Dear friends, one thing about smartness which I learnt early in my medical career is that a senior doctor should not give very long lectures, and should end up his speech before time.
I have written many more things about the essentials of being a truly good doctor, and the glorious traditions of our noble, almost divine profession, in my book “The Doctor Gene’. If you did not get a copy outside, please email thedoctorgene@gmail.com to get your copy.
I am sure that you will all be very successful doctors, and I will be very happy if my words today help you deal with your medical life smartly. I thank you for patiently listening to me today.

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Love to you all and I wish you all the best, always!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
03.08.2016
Thank you, Mr. Yashodhan Morye and BJMC UG Student’s Council

The Doctor India Needs Most

The Doctor India Needs Most.Photo 13-11-15, 23 58 36a

(c) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“It’s high time you dropped a big stone upon her head” said the doctor.

Shocked to the core, I looked up to find all three of them heartily laughing: the doctor, the patient and the relative.

This was a 92 year old lady, who had seen Doctor P. D. Purandare for most of her adult life as her primary care physician. She was still healthy otherwise, but often complained of “feeling not perfect, occasional headaches, lack of sleep, reduced appetite etc.”, mostly age related and chronic complaints resistant to most commonly used medicines. The daughter in law, obedient and polite, but fed up with her “whining” mother in law, had asked doctor PDP if he couldn’t “permanently cure” her symptoms. The ever smiling, 70 year old family physician who was known to make even patients on their deathbeds laugh, had replied “It’s high time you dropped a stone upon her head”.

The old lady was unaffected. Education and “legal awareness” had not yet spoiled the friendly doctor-patient relationship by then. She touched the doctor’s face with gratitude. “I am sure I will not die as long as you are around, Doctor. Don’t teach such things to my Sunbai (Bahu / Daughter in law)” replied the old lady, laughing out of her edentulous mouth, a cute laughter that offends nobody, a privilege only of the very old.

I was on a vacation after my final year MBBS exams, and having no daytime friends (explainations later), went to one of the most favourite people in my life: Dr. P. D. Purandare, a general practitioner and family physician who practiced in the small and (then) backward / orthodox town of Nanded. His clinic was an open-for- all walk-in all 7 days, 11 AM till 11 PM. The only rule was the waiting number system. Next patient was the only VIP, whoever you happened to be.

At around every midnight, Dr. PDP dropped me home after the last patient left. There was never any haste at all, the last patient got the same fresh and relaxed doctor that the first one did. Dr. PDP lived his life in his medical practice. Once I asked him why he chose to practice in Nanded while his hometown was the big and developed famous city of Pune. His answer had no flavoured ego, pride or hypocrisy: “Because there was only one family physician here, there was a need for more, given the population” he replied.

He had studied his Medicine in Lucknow. He practiced a few years in East Africa, then returned to India. A scholar in many disciplines especially music and philosophy, extremely well read, fluent in most Indian major languages, he was the only person I have seen
who entered anyone’s hPhoto 13-11-15, 23 56 34aeart freely and spread joy there.

My parents took me to him right from my infancy for any health issues. Vaccination onwards, he had grown me up to a robust health. Whenever I had holidays while in Medical College, I went to attend his OPD. There was so much to learn about humanity and medicine from him. In spite of being a very scientific doctor and a royal human being, he treated everyone as his equal. I have never seen him disturbed or angry. Like James Bond, his humour sprung forth like a fountain in the most unlikely and disturbing situations, and it was only later that people realised that it was that humour which broke the ill spell on that moment. Never cheap but never also mild, his stinging comments usually made people blush. He donned the magic of good sarcasm that left no bruised egos.

He never asked for money from any patient. Most patients went themselves and paid to his compounder HariSingh. Regularly following up patients were supposed to make entries in their own diaries about how much they owed to the doctor and pay as and when possible. People usually paid once or twice in a year, he never saw their books. HariSingh collected the money and hande
d it over to Dr. PDP. Of course many people duped him. Even in that pre-cellphone era, people called him up on all days and nights, and visited his home for emergency and ease both, but his calm was seldom offended.

One very poor man came with his daughter of about 21, told the doctor about her constant headaches, also adding details about his financial status, that her marriage was held up thanks to his poverty. Dr. PDP wrote the prescription after examining the young girl, now visibly embarrassed by her father’s disclosure. The father pulled out his reluctant wallet from the depths of his clothes. “How much?” he asked. Dr. PDP, with no high-handed expression upon his face, said “Don’t worry.. You don’t pay.” As the hefty farmer father started sobbing out of gratitude, Dr. Purandare asked him if he can please borrow some betel nuts (supari) from him, which had accompanied the wallet from his pocket. Laughing and crying at the same time, the father gave the “supari” to Dr. PDP and touched his feet, asked his daughter to do the same, and told her “This is where they say God is”.

One of the best habits I learned from Dr. PDP was to never count the money someone handed over in good faith. Trust was his second na
ture, and patients swore by his integrity. “It will all stay here, not with you or me” he winked when anyone requested him to count the money.

A visibly shaking Sikh man, walked in, bending forwards and walking very slowly, his actions frozen intermittently, and voice almost inaudibly low. Dr PDP explained to me the classical symptoms of Parkinsonism. A decade later, learning advanced Neurology in Canada, I often wondered how exact and ahead of time was this general practitioner in a small town in India, and what a sad destiny that there was no one around him then to applaud all the talent he had! This, I know even now, is the case of so many excellent clinicians, general practitioners and family physicians in India, whose medical talent goes unnoticed and unacknowledged just because the society is yet to wake up to it.
****
“Your son is unlikely to survive”
I heard the physician (Dr. AA) tell my parents. I heard my mother wail and my father sob, and in a few minutes my mom was frantically calling one of our neighbours: “Please get a rickshaw and go to Dr. Purandare, ask him I have begged him to run here at once”. Mr. Raghvendra Katti, my father’s favourite student, went in heavy rains upon his Luna moped to fetch Dr. PDP.

It was just after my second year MBBS exam. I had developed typhoid fever, and late during recovery the fever had suddenly shot up one day, and I had become delirious. My consciousness was fluctuating, and highest antibiotics were on. There was a suspicion that something was wrong, but nobody could identify what. Three specialists had already asked my parents to shift me to civil hospital ICU, fearing bad outcome. Fever went upto 105 dF.

Dr. PDP came, all wet and tense. After going through all details and examining me, he asked the treating doctor to give me a shot of steroid. “But he may worsen with steroid” said the treating doc who had a higher degree, and refused to give me the injection. As my mom insisted, he wrote a note on paper that Dr. PDP will be responsible for any consequences. Everyone signed it. Then they gave me a shot. Within an hour, the fever started subsiding. By three hours, I was feeling better. He sat besides me, whistling.

“Chai pilao (Get me some tea)” he smiled as he told my crying parents “Ye saala wapas aagaya (This idiot has returned)”. The physician apologised to him for the “legal” note. “It’s ok, doc, he has reacted to something. Recurring typhoid fever does not shoot up this sudden”. Dr. PDP said. It was later found that the IV fluid was impure. Just changing that made a difference (The company was later banned).

He gave me his old “Savill’s” textbook of clinical medicine as a birthday gift. It is one of the most beautiful clinical textbooks I ever read!

“Har Bandar ka Madaari (A magician who handles all types of monkeys)” was his favourite expression to describe himself as a general practitioner. “You must know basic treatments of everything” he taught me. India needs many many thousand Dr. Prabhakar Purandares today, and also the same patient-doctor relationship where the patient had equal responsibility of faith and trust as the doctor, and both carried it graciously.

He initiated me during my undergraduate days into philosophy, with Jiddu Krisnamurthy, Ashtavakra Geeta, Osho Rajneesh and then Stephen Hawking. When I told him I actually met Dr Stephen Hawking, he was as happy and proud as my father would be. He still prays, meditates and laughs everyday, and makes everyone around him laugh too. He has retired, and lives happily in Nanded.

Everytime we meet, he turns into the Master once again:
“When you realize that all the diseases and diagnoses are not in the books, you become a mature doctor. The disease in mind is far more difficult to treat than that in the body. The young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions”. His teachings are etched upon my brain.

Once in a very bad, low phase of life, deserted and hurt by the way I was treated by my own, I went to him and broke down. This feeling of being isolated and tortured for being different in my thinking is unbearable. He just sat besides me, didn’t say a word till I stopped crying.

Then he said:
“Pick up the immortals among those who you want your certificates from”.

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Never Go To Any Doctor

Never Go To Any Doctor

(c) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“All doctors are thieves. They spend crores to get the degrees and then squeeze patients all their life to earn, doing unnecessary tests, prescribing costly medicines and doing unnecessary surgeries and plasties. I know. I have many doctor friends who tell me when they are drunk”: Arrogant, khadi, Gold, Perfume, Rolex, Gutkha. Add political party of choice. His breathless wife was advised some tests by some other Doctor, and he was complaining about it.

“Sorry Sir, I cannot take this case” said the Doctor now seeing the case, and wrote upon the paper: “Hostile patient / relative”.

The doctor has till now endured too much deceit and pain out of “presumed innocent” population’s baseless allegations uplifted by media. He will easily give up any possible earning from such cases which drain his blood and his reputation.

This is becoming common now.

Let us take off the Holy Apron for a few moments and sit across the table for some school-grade naked logic.
If all doctors are bad, well, don’t ever go to a doctor or hospital. If all doctors are not bad, stop generalizing.

If you think tests advised by the doctor are unnecessary, either don’t do the tests or go to another doctor. You cannot change or challenge the hard-earned wisdom of a qualified doctor. You cannot force a doctor to treat without his/her comfort of knowledge about the patient’s condition (for which tests are required).

(c) Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Have courage to decline tests, admission, surgery and medical treatment on your own, and also to own that responsibility, for yourself or your dependents. Write freely upon the doctor’s note that you do not believe his / her opinion, want another, and that you decline the tests and medicines. That way nothing is hidden. Stop bickering and backbiting a profession that is by and large coping up with the country’s health burden.
Change the doctor, don’t expect a busy specialist to pleasure-massage your medical knowledge.
If you want old age sweet talking doctors, please do not expect new age technology / medicines / surgeries to be involved, neither new age results which are far better. Illness, Disability and Death were gracefully accepted as “Ill-Fate / Destiny” in old age, doctors were not blamed for any of these. Continue that tradition. If you want don’t want completely “professional” attitude from a doctor, please write to the Judiciary which has termed the patient a “Consumer”. Doctors will also make human mistakes, declare your acceptance and write a note that you will not sue the doctor for any mistake. If you want the freedom to sue for gorgeous compensation amounts, you must sacrifice the wish to have “emotionally connected, involved” doctors who try all that they can for their patients. Highly scientific, legal and professional will also be costlier by definition.

Nothing has ever gone cheaper in the world, stop expecting that medical care will. Doctors have to spend a lot upon education (they do not decide the fees for medical colleges, and it is not their fault to want to become a doctor), and they will of course have to earn atleast what they spend upon their education. Who will become a doctor with a wish to be bankrupt?. From onions to your children’s fees to your current phone, things have become costly by the day, why will the doctor not have to earn more?

To accuse that all doctors earn by wrong means is as idiotic and unfair as blaming an entire religion or gender.

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Insurance companies and most corporates are out to earn profit, they do not care about you or the outcome. It is only the doctor whose effort and wish are always oriented towards a good outcome for each patient. No doctor enjoys a bad outcome. His/her own reputation is on the line with the outcome, he / she will never risk that. This is also the reason why doctors have become extremely sensitive to hostile / legal-oriented patients / relatives and either avoid them or make them go through all legal (sometimes unnecessary) formalities to keep a proof of everything, should things go wrong. It is not possible to be compassionate and sympathetic towards someone who is looking at you with suspicion, treating all your motives as malignant, and bargaining every penny they can to get the cheapest test and treatment options. One idiotic comment, one threat or one word of suspicion said to the treating doctor starts the process of converting a good-natured doctor into a consumer-service medical professional who maintains a distance. A little good natured talk may quickly translate into legal traps, so most doctors now take precautions not to indulge beyond “strictly necessary” communication with most patients.
We live in India, corruption is the baseline in most spheres. This goes for some doctors, some hospitals and some investigation centers (pathology, radiology etc.). There is no denying that. Not all pathology labs use standard protocols, not all radiology centers do proper studies. Not all doctors make profitless / correct decisions. So if your doctor tells you to visit a particular lab or specialist, it is not because of financial gains always. One has to justify patient’s faith and advise the best. It is not possible / ethical to speak ill about others, so doctors just go by the preferences which they have by experience of years realized suit their wisdom and ethics.

Take the example of a singer. He/she has to have the musicians of choice, who suit their own thinking, style and sense of singing. You cannot force a violinist or guitarist or drummer of your choice upon the Maestro / singer. It will then become a discordant concert. If the Maestro / singer is responsible for the concert, he / she will need the freedom to choose his / her fellow musicians / assistants / music specialists.
Life is far more complicated than music, and medical decisions are often complicated beyond the understanding of google-graduates. The wise will know to have faith in the doctor they choose and benefit from it. The suspicious and oversmarts will keep on doing themselves / dependents harm by spoiling the whole process.
The only thing more important for a doctor than the patient is his / her own reputation. If you are a risk to that, the doctor may refrain from wholeheartedly trying to do best for you. He will do what is legally correct, which may save the doc, but not always do good to the patient.

Like some idol who you have idolized since childhood shoving you away in his / her bad mood in the one lifetime moment you meet them, young doctors who were always taught in all medical schools to “Love” their patients beyond themselves suddenly come across violent, accusative, paranoid patients and relatives, and almost never recover from that grievous mental trauma.

How much for an eye? How much for a limb? How much to hear your beloved talk again? How much to see your loved one coming out alive from the operation theater? How much to see them smile again? How much for a life?
Choose the cheapest options, google everything, hire a lawyer and find out. Why go to a Doctor at all?

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

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