Tag Archives: Muslim

The Proud Indian

 

The Proud Indian
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“I was a man of action. It hurts me inside when I look at myself now” said the huge gentleman.
It was indeed sad to see the state he was in. Parkinson’s disease not only slows the body, but also makes one quite stiff, as if the body is made of some heavy stone. The side effects of levodopa, the most common medicine used in Parkinson’s disease patients, was also causing too many abnormal movements.I told him that some changes were required in his doses, and that I needed his cooperation and patience. He agreed, then I wrote him a new prescription.

“By the way, Doctor, if any of your poor patients needs any help with treatment or medicines, please let me know. I will arrange” he said once I finished with the instructions. Always needy for this cause, I took down his details.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

He came over a month later, happy. This time he donated for an orphanage I often wrote about. I was more than happy, and told him he did not have to pay my fees ever.

“Thank you, Doctor, but you must let me help your poor patients” said Mr. Abdulkadar Mulla.

Over a period of time, I came to know that he donates medicines and free check up kits required for the treatment of young girls from interior adiwasi areas. He spends thousands of rupees every year, since many years, to help run health camps for such children, mostly through the BKL Walawalkar hospital at Dervan in Ratnagiri district.

This time Mr. Abdulkadar Mulla came over, I tried to understand why he is going out of the way to help out children from the interior.

“Because most people are interested in the kind of show-off charity. When you donate to famous organizations in the big cities, your contributions are recognized and published instantly. That is one reason, charity does not often reach where it must: the interior, deprived sections of our country”.
He paused.
“I must say this, doctor, please don’t misunderstand. I feel very bad when someone thinks of me less of a patriot just because I am a Muslim. I have served in Indian police, I have been in the elite VVIP security, I have served India as my own country. It hurts me when some people loose talk that all Muslims should go to Pakistan. India is my country too, I was born and brought up here, studied alongside classmates from many other religions, I have friends in almost every religion. I have served the nation honestly in an extremely responsible position, and am now serving the society by contributing in the most impartial way I can. There are limitations to what I can do as an individual to go on proving my honesty to my country. It hurts when people accuse us without even knowing us. From film stars to cricket players, so many Muslims are making India proud, still some people generalise against us”.

I had no answer. I told him that at least doctors are bred to never entertain that discrimination, that no medical student is fit to become a doctor until he / she can see each patient only as a human life without any other tag. Whether it is policemen or criminals, dirty politicians or reporters who paint our profession in the worst shades, patient from this country or that, from one religion or another: we doctors have only one duty: save life, safeguard health. There is no religion to the happiness of a saved life, nor to the agony of a death. There is no religion to the hand that helps. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

I remembered the many Muslim classmates I had through my school and medical college. In fact, I was so close to one in my medical college, that his mother loved me like her own child, and cooked me delicious ‘vegetarian’ dishes whenever I went to their home. Some of my Muslim friends now have their own hospitals treating patients from all religions, especially poor. One of my extremely religious Muslim friends, a super-specialist, treats hundreds of poor patients from all religions: without any discrimination in his treatment or approach.

All of us have been through this, everyone who truly worships God knows love for other human beings. It is very important to pass this “Indianness” on to the future generations, and not fall prey to lesser thoughts, however loud. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Mr. Mulla told me he had had a spinal surgery, during which a surgeon mentioned the charity work at Dervan hospital. “I decided to donate to this hospital at Dervan. This way my hard-earned money reaches where it is most needed” he said. This institute, presently headed by Dr. Suvarna Patil, conducts multiple health-centered activities for children on a charity basis. Many renowned doctors and other professionals from India and abroad participate in their activities.

“Saare Jahan Se Achcha Hindosta Hamara” by the poet Iqbal brings tears to my eyes every time I hear it! I am proud to meet the likes of Mr. Abdulkadar Mulla, who prove by their silent actions who they truly are. I am also proud to belong to the community of doctors, for whom human life is beyond any discrimination.

Jai Hind! Happy Republic Day!
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande
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Doctors and Religion

Doctors and Religion.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“You are in our prayers everyday”.. one of the greatest achievements in becoming a doctor is hearing this sentence.

But hey! You all are also there in our prayers every day!

Whatever the religion, whichever faith one may come from, whether rich or poor, whether our concepts, philosophies or traditions match or clash, we doctors treat each patient with the same devotion: making his / her health better. A doctor will only ask about your religion to know your genetic risks and tendencies, lifestyle and diet. Beyond that, no doctor thinks differently about patients from different religions. Who knows better than the doctor, the oneness of human body, inside out?

We don’t have to kill, sing, dance, wear T shirts or shout to prove our unique tradition of “Humanity”: we carry it upon our head from the day we are born as a doctor, till the day we die. Every day in every casualty anywhere in the world, elixir of humanity flows from the doctors and nurses to the patient, and in their prayers lie the true wish of every doctor: “Let all suffering end”.

Most of those visiting religious places ask for health and life. Doctors too work to safeguard these two, all over the world, irrespective of their beliefs. Science gives us the knowledge, Experience hones our wisdom, but the prayers of millions in different religions give us the ability and responsibility to make the right choices.

Our patients, whichever religion they belong to, bring us religious gifts from their highest places of devotion. From Varanasi and Mecca, From Jerusalem and Amritsar, Ma Vaishno Devi, Our Lady of Good Health in Velankanni, Lord Ayyappa temple, Khwaja Ajmer Shareef, Shri Tirupati, Bodh Gaya and many other holiest places, I have received Lord’s blessings via my patients, just like most of my colleagues I know. Abe Zamzam and Gangajal have both felicitated the work of many of us, via God’s messengers to the Doctor: the patients.

Any patient from any country and any religion holds some basic respect for the doctor they go to, for their education, and also for their presumed ability to help.. This “trust of a stranger” is probably the greatest endangered human connection upon earth today.There is no better opportunity to serve humanity than to become a doctor. If there is any social place where everyone is really equal, it is the heart of a good doctor. There are offenders of faith, and misusers of the system everywhere in the world: few doctors and few patients, but not all.

There is so much for the doctor to learn from different religions. The art of medical practice is incomplete without basic knowledge and understanding of human behavior, faith and mindsets. While “scientific” is the highest and umcompromisable criteria for a doctor’s action, this will only bring the patient health, which is incomplete without happiness. Happiness will only come from a doctor who understands human nature well. There, in the wish for happiness in each mind, resides the Lord. Some call it science, some God. Some do not believe in God, both doctors and patients. If themselves genuine, they still connect well via bonds of honesty, kindness, truthfulness and mutual respect: similar foundations as that of most religions.

Many patients will not believe this, but most doctors pray for all their patients everyday before starting their work.
In the good of their patient, they know, lies their own good.
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande