Tag Archives: school

The Extinction of Precious: A Medical Horror Story Happening Right Now!

28378266_1572654156163240_5674072141041150378_n

The Extinction of Precious:
A Medical Horror Story Happening Right Now!
©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“Sir, we have come from Konkan”, said the father, “to seek your advice and blessings . My son has passed the medical postgraduate exams with national rank 30. He wants to decide which branch he should choose”.

I congratulated the genius. Passing medical entrances with high merit requires great talent. It does not earn the glamour, claps and appreciation of stage and limelight, for we live in a society that only worships looks, muscles, bhashanbazi, financial success and sports (sorry, one sport. Even if someone wins a world gold in any other sport than cricket, they go home in an auto rickshaw when they return to India!).

Speaking with the boy, I realised that he was very sensitive, compassionate and had an excellent logic and reasoning. Besides having a calm bearing, he was also a hard worker. A perfect blend for becoming a great physician or a surgeon, in a world that is fast losing able clinicians. I suggested him to prefer Internal medicine.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

They looked awkwardly towards each other. The boy garnered some courage to speak.

“Sir, I saw our family doctor being beaten up by a local politician, his clinic was ruined. He was humiliated in the worst language in front of his wife and children, and instead of protecting him, other patients in his hospital kept on recording videos of the incident, which later became viral. He left, we don’t know where he went. I cannot ever think of directly dealing with patients now. I want to choose a non- clinical or para-clinical branch.”

I appealed to the father: “Your son has a great potential and matching talent to become a good clinician, we desperately need many more. It is not necessary that he practices in your own town or even in India. The whole world needs good doctors. Please think about this”.

The father, a simple teacher from a primary school, thought for a prolonged moment. His eyes reddened up.
“I don’t know, Sir. When he said he wanted to become a doctor, his mother and I always thought that he will become a saviour, running around saving people’s lives. We were never interested in only money. But the day that we saw our own doctor being beaten up by a crowd and the local politician, we realised how helpless a doctor’s life is. We knew our doctor for over 25 years, he was like a God for many in our town. All he did in 25 years became a zero in a few minutes, thanks to a hooligan politico and his crowd. We don’t want our son to ever face that. If we had a daughter in his place, we wouldn’t even have made her a doctor, women as doctors suffer a lot more trouble and get no returns, sometimes even from their family. And this is our only son, we want him to stay in India near us.”

Somehow I didn’t want to give up convincing him, he was an ideal candidate for becoming an excellent clinician.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande “Think of the future. Hopefully there will be better laws, he can also consider working in bigger, safer hospitals if he is scared”.

“What would you advise your own son if you were in my place, Sir?” asked the father.

He had bombed my mind.
I was trained by parents and teachers to always do good, be compassionate and kind. My kids had a potential to become great doctors coming from this background. I worry a lot about the extremely critical condition of deteriorating healthcare standards and reducing number of good clinicians that is destined to cause a havoc in a few years. Still, honestly, I did not wish upon my children the insecurities and threats I face. I don’t want them to live under the perpetual fear of being vandalised, defamed, tortured by over-expectation and punished by committees made up of politicians and medically inexperienced judicial experts. I won’t want their lives, work hours and remunerations to be dictated by a corrupt bunch living for votes of free mongers.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

It would be hypocrisy to advise someone else what I wouldn’t choose for myself. That’s how a doctor makes the best possible decision. With a heavy heart, I advised him what I always advised my children:

“I agree. Please choose what suits your heart most, what gives you fearless happiness in your work and also leaves you with some time for yourself and your family, ensures a good income and is not dependent upon jealous people’s expectations of what you should do and for what price. You have so many options for social service other than becoming a clinician. I am sure you will stay a good human being all your life.” I suggested him two para-clinical branches that offer good scope.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The world indeed will have to suffer the gradual extinction of good clinicians. We need many more excellent doctors in para clinical and non clinical areas too, but the face of the profession is the clinician, and we certainly, desperately need many thousand more. It is a fact that in spite of increasing number of doctors, patients still die travelling in an ambulance to reach good healthcare far away from most homes in India. Many federal orphans who cannot even afford government healthcare die at home.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

The father asked his son to touch my feet. As he did so, the melancholy of my own advice bit my heart. I couldn’t let down the flag of my noble profession.

“Listen, dear. I am speaking this against my own convictions. I am struggling. Think about becoming a good clinician and practising in a safe country, take your parents with you. I will be happy whatever you finally decide, but not everyone has the ability and talent to become a good doctor, it is rarest of the rare traits.”© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

They left. So did a part of my hope for the future of good healthcare.

When the next couple walked in with an infant baby in their hands, I looked at the smiling baby, and forced a smile. She didn’t know it yet, but I had just bought a precious gift for her.

©️ Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Please share unedited.

Death and Disability by Overwork:  An Indian Diagnosis 

Death and Disability by Overwork:
An Indian Diagnosis
© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“We are helpless, our life has no worth in the eyes of authority “ said the school teacher.

He had recovered from unconsciousness just a few hours ago, his brain had developed huge clots due to thickening of blood, because he was dehydrated overworking. Due to back pressure generated in the blocked veins, there was bleeding in his brain.

“I was out on the election duty, and did not get time to eat or have water. I returned late night and felt nauseated because of the bus travel, so just had a little rice and slept off. The next morning I had terrible headache. Just after the breakfast the headache worsened and I started vomiting. As our leaves were canceled, it was compulsory to go to work. So in spite of the headache I went for a bath, then I don’t remember, till I woke up in the hospital”.

His wife continued: “I heard a big noise in the bathroom and rushed there, found him lying in a pool of blood, convulsing”. She paused to wipe tears, still unable to overcome the horror of that memory, then resumed: “I called our neighbors, one of them took us to the rural hospital in his tractor. They did a CT scan and started treatment “.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

“But you are a school teacher, why were you doing an election duty?” I asked him.

“It is compulsory for all govt staff. We must comply or we won’t get our salaries or promotions.” He replied.

This wasn’t new. Doctors often attend many a police, labourers, and other “government service“ personnel serving either the state of central government (under different political parties), who drop either sick, unconscious or dead while overworking. The common factor is they are almost all low level desperate employees who cannot say ‘No’ to the forced additional work thrust unto them. I have never seen a senior officer or a politician coming to the hospital due to physical overwork. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

To add to the inequality, it is the senior officials / politicos, ministers who can avail of deluxe / higher budget private medical facilities including overseas medicare, whereas the actual ones who get sick shedding blood and sweat in the field are left at the mercy of scanty healthcare facility in government hospitals or low budget schemes at private hospitals. Much like the red light cars ferrying ministers getting preferences over even the ambulances for the poor.

Recently a police officer was brought by his colleagues, he had developed high blood pressure due to an extended duty. A blood vessel in his brain had ruptured, causing huge bleeding. With a great effort he recovered from the coma in few days, but his speech is now forever gone, and he is bedridden due to paralysis on one side. © Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Doctors working in different state / central hospitals too are not an exception. Many tasks / schemes / targets are mindlessly shoved into their routine, presuming that if someone is a government servant, he/ she is a slave to the whims of authorities who can order anything. Besides being taken for granted about 24/7 availability, besides completely ignoring the human right recommendations about working hours, the threatening, demeaning and pressurising humiliation continues almost in every field, where the lower you rank, the worst your slavery.

In a country with excess population, why should there arise a need for one person being burdened with the work of two or three? Why should a school teacher perform an election duty, population stats/ census duty, etc? Why should a police employee work beyond his / her physical capacity? Why cannot the governments hire more people in a country teeming with unemployed youths agitating about almost everything everywhere?© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

If someone wants to work extra for patriotic or financial reasons, they should be able to. But when one is forced to work beyond capacity and legitimate duty, we are encouraging not only health risks, but creating chances of nothing being done correctly. Stress is a major killer via diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks, strokes and depression/ suicides, and while we encourage Yoga for stress relief, we must also reduce overloading one with the duties of three.

“I sympathise with your condition, you should recover well, but you must avoid such overworking now. Also never fast. Drink plenty of water. I feel bad about your extra duties.” I told him.

He smiled in embarrassment, and said “I feel ashamed that while I teach my students to stand against injustice and inequality, to courageously fight to set right what is wrong, I am myself a coward who cannot do so, for without this job I will not be able to survive. I want to be a good teacher, I love teaching and my students love me very much, but inside, I feel I am lying to them when I accept this humiliation by those who I work for. Believe me, doctor, that even when I got unconscious, no one among those who ordered me extra work cared whether I woke up or not”.© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

He was telling the desperate story of many, and I found myself unable to answer once more: that if we have so many educated people who have time to quote history and protest against various political parties or events, if we have so many rich leaders who openly award crores for killing someone (hello, Milords of Indian Justice!), why cannot we distribute duties well and let a school teacher happily just teach instead of dying forcibly doing something else?

© Dr. Rajas Deshpande

Please share unedited.
Dedicated to all teachers.